Dwarves hidden in sports bags target Swedish coaches

Police probe audacious cargo-hold robberies


Swedish police are quizzing "people of limited stature" with criminal records following a spate of robberies from the cargo holds of coaches - possibly carried out by dwarves smuggled onboard in sports bags.

According to the Sun, the gang responsible pack their vertically-challenged accomplices into bags and stick them in with other passengers' luggage. The undercover operatives then rifle the hold for valuables before resealing themselves in their hiding place, to be extracted later by another gang member at the coach's final destination.

National coach operator Swebus confirmed it'd been hit by the audacious crims, who have over the last few months has lifted "thousands of pounds" in cash, jewellery and other valuables.

The company's sales manager, Ingvar Ryggasjo, said that one short person had been put aboard a coach in a hockey bag. A female passenger said she'd seen some men squeezing the "large, heavy bag" into the cargo hold, and that she later found she'd been relieved of stuff including a camera and purse.

Ryggasjo concluded: “We think it is a short, young person, dwarves or perhaps children. We are taking extra security measures and are thinking of installing video surveillance cameras.” ®


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