'Rowdy' rectal extraction op vid hits YouTube

Filipino docs may regret 'Baby out!' spray canister merriment


Hospital authorities in the Philippines are none too pleased with three doctors and a nurse who extracted a 15cm spray canister from a male patient's rectum in a "rowdy" operation, footage of which subsequently popped up in three-minute video on YouTube

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III has ordered an investigation into the unnamed quartet from the Vicente Sotto Memorial Medical Centre in Cebu, AP reports. The 3 January video shows the medical staff "laughing, giggling and cheering", and at one point features a hand holding a mobile phone moving in to capture an additional close-up of the action.

As a doctor "gingerly" pulls out the canister, one wag shouts "Baby out!" to loud cheers. The man left holding the baby then sprays its contents on the onlookers.

Although the hospital has, following a probe, recommended "filing administrative cases against the four personnel, with penalties ranging from reprimands to dismissals for violating a code of conduct and ethical standards", the country's Health Department makes the final call.

The hospital explained in a statement that while the successful operation "may have prompted the cheers", it conceded they were "excessive and inappropriate and some acts were already in violation of some hospital policies".

As well as the four direct participants in the video, the procedure was observed by a fourth doctor and three other nurses - subsequently "sternly warned" - and a group of nursing students from a local school. The clinical instructor in charge of the students was banned from the hospital, while one of his charges is under investigation for allegedly publishing the video on YouTube.

The subject of the footage, an unnamed 39-year-old, is unimpressed with the hospital's handling of the outrage. His lawyer, Guiller Ceniza, said: "We are not satisfied with the proceedings conducted by the hospital. All the while we thought that they were conducting an administrative proceeding... to impose sanctions but what turned out was merely a fact-finding inquiry."

Pending the Health Department's ultimate decision on the fate of the four accused, Ceniza's client next week plans to file a suit "seeking the revocation of the licences of those responsible and a civil suit for damages".

In case you're wondering just how the poor bloke got a 15cm spray canister up his back passage in the first place, Ceniza explained he'd indulged in a New Year's Eve drinking spree and one-night stand with a male partner and was "too drunk to remember how [it] ended up in his body". ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Pentester pops open Tesla Model 3 using low-cost Bluetooth module
    Anything that uses proximity-based BLE is vulnerable, claim researchers

    Tesla Model 3 and Y owners, beware: the passive entry feature on your vehicle could potentially be hoodwinked by a relay attack, leading to the theft of the flash motor.

    Discovered and demonstrated by researchers at NCC Group, the technique involves relaying the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) signals from a smartphone that has been paired with a Tesla back to the vehicle. Far from simply unlocking the door, this hack lets a miscreant start the car and drive away, too.

    Essentially, what happens is this: the paired smartphone should be physically close by the Tesla to unlock it. NCC's technique involves one gadget near the paired phone, and another gadget near the car. The phone-side gadget relays signals from the phone to the car-side gadget, which forwards them to the vehicle to unlock and start it. This shouldn't normally happen because the phone and car are so far apart. The car has a defense mechanism – based on measuring transmission latency to detect that a paired device is too far away – that ideally prevents relayed signals from working, though this can be defeated by simply cutting the latency of the relay process.

    Continue reading
  • Google assuring open-source code to secure software supply chains
    Java and Python packages are the first on the list

    Google has a plan — and a new product plus a partnership with developer-focused security shop Snyk — that attempts to make it easier for enterprises to secure their open source software dependencies.

    The new service, announced today at the Google Cloud Security Summit, is called Assured Open Source Software. We're told it will initially focus on some Java and Python packages that Google's own developers prioritize in their workflows. 

    These two programming languages have "particularly high-risk profiles," Google Cloud Cloud VP and GM Sunil Potti said in response to The Register's questions. "Remember Log4j?" Yes, quite vividly.

    Continue reading
  • Rocket Lab is taking NASA's CAPSTONE to the Moon
    Mission to lunar orbit is further than any Photon satellite bus has gone before

    Rocket Lab has taken delivery of NASA's CAPSTONE spacecraft at its New Zealand launch pad ahead of a mission to the Moon.

    It's been quite a journey for CAPSTONE [Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment], which was originally supposed to launch from Rocket Lab's US launchpad at Wallops Island in Virginia.

    The pad, Launch Complex 2, has been completed for a while now. However, delays in certifying Rocket Lab's Autonomous Flight Termination System (AFTS) pushed the move to Launch Complex 1 in Mahia, New Zealand.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022