Dell's wee Eee-alike uncovered

Michael Dell reveals all, sort of


Pictures of Dell’s upcoming Eee PC look-a-like have been revealed, and it’s rumoured to be called the Mini Inspiron.

Dell_mini_inspiron_01

Dell's Mini Inspiron could ship in June

Last month, an unnamed executive from Taiwanese contract manufacturer Compal claimed it is building an Eee PC rival for Dell. It's thought the PC will use Intel’s ‘Diamondville’ Atom processor and will be released sometime in June.

But, according to Gizmodo, Dell’s very own Michael Dell has since told the news site that the upcoming small form factor PC has been designed as a low-cost notebook for developing countries.

Dell_mini_inspiron_02

Pencil not included

Although he wasn’t kind enough to give away any of the machine’s specs, it was noted that the PC being held by Michael Dell had three USB ports, a memory card reader and Ethernet connection. The machine was also bright red and came with a stylish black sleeve.

Dell is obviously under pressure to reveal more information about the Mini Inspiron though, because it’s also released some official snaps – as shown above.

It’s not yet known if the Mini Inspiron will be released in the UK, or if it’ll be marketed alongside an Eee-esque perky and attractive female.

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