AMD targets Puma 'Centrino beater' at consumers, SMEs

Laptop platform gets teeth into HD


AMD launched its long-awaited Puma laptop platform this morning into an unexpectedly open market after Intel was forced to delay its refreshed Centrino 2 platform.

Puma is built around AMD's Turion X2 Ultra Dual-Core Mobile processor but the vendor has put HD at the centre of its pitch. Puma features integrated ATI Radeon HD 3200 Graphics and supports DirextX10. It will also offer other discrete ATI Radeon graphics set-ups. Part of the pitch is its ability to run both the built-in and discrete graphics set-ups in tandem.

Power management comes courtesy of AMD Enhanced PowerNow Technology and ATI PowerXpress Technology. The main chip will shut down individual components to save power, while the graphics power technology will, for example, shut down discrete graphics when running on battery power, and kick it back in when the laptop is plugged in to the wall.

Perhaps more to the point, AMD claimed that systems were available from OEMs right now, giving it the opportunity - if it can grasp it – to exploit the gap left open by Intel’s Centrino 2 fumble.

Intel admitted last week that problems with both the chipset for Centrino 2, AKA 'Montevina', and with the wireless platform’s antennae has forced it to postpone shipments of the processor until August at the earliest.

It’s fair to expect that AMD would be doing its utmost to benefit from Chipzilla’s current misfortune, perhaps by punting the Puma platform, at business customers.

But, according to the company’s EMEA product and platform marketing manager Ian McNaughton, enterprise customers only account for 20 per cent of the market. He reckoned that focusing on small-to-medium businesses (SMBs) and consumers was the best way for the firm to beef up sales.

"It's not a question of not being big in enterprise because the line between what is enterprise and SMB is interesting, right?" he said. "So what we’re focused on in 2008 is 80 per cent of the market.”

McNaughton said AMD plans to showcase ultra portable and enterprise-centric products in 2009 but added that those markets have never been the "focus of Puma".

He also refused to make comparisons with Montevina. "We compare what is available on the market. The minute it launches we will be making that comparison, but until that happens it is all conjecture."

McNaughton did however compare the new platform to Intel's Santa Rosa chip, which - he claimed - unlike Puma, has no support for DirectX 10, offers only limited HD acceleration, has limited wireless range and throughput, and, when switching between graphics, requires a reboot.

AMD might well grab some of Intel's market share over the coming months while its rival hurries to shove its delayed Centrino 2 processor out the door, but it will take a lot more than a feisty Puma for AMD to steal the crown from the king of the chip jungle. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Carnival Cruises torpedoed by US states, agrees to pay $6m after waves of cyberattacks
    Now those are some phishing boats

    Carnival Cruise Lines will cough up more than $6 million to end two separate lawsuits filed by 46 states in the US after sensitive, personal information on customers and employees was accessed in a string of cyberattacks.

    A couple of years ago, as the coronavirus pandemic was taking hold, the Miami-based biz revealed intruders had not only encrypted some of its data but also downloaded a collection of names and addresses; Social Security info, driver's license, and passport numbers; and health and payment information of thousands of people in almost every American state.

    It all started to go wrong more than a year prior, as the cruise line became aware of suspicious activity in May 2019. This apparently wasn't disclosed until 10 months later, in March 2020.

    Continue reading
  • India extends deadline for compliance with infosec logging rules by 90 days
    Helpfully announced extension on deadline day

    India's Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY) and the local Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT-In) have extended the deadline for compliance with the Cyber Security Directions introduced on April 28, which were due to take effect yesterday.

    The Directions require verbose logging of users' activities on VPNs and clouds, reporting of infosec incidents within six hours of detection - even for trivial things like unusual port scanning - exclusive use of Indian network time protocol servers, and many other burdensome requirements. The Directions were purported to improve the security of local organisations, and to give CERT-In information it could use to assess threats to India. Yet the Directions allowed incident reports to be sent by fax – good ol' fax – to CERT-In, which offered no evidence it operates or would build infrastructure capable of ingesting or analyzing the millions of incident reports it would be sent by compliant organizations.

    The Directions were roundly criticized by tech lobby groups that pointed out requirements such as compelling clouds to store logs of customers' activities was futile, since clouds don't log what goes on inside resources rented by their customers. VPN providers quit India and moved their servers offshore, citing the impossibility of storing user logs when their entire business model rests on not logging user activities. VPN operators going offshore means India's government is therefore less able to influence such outfits.

    Continue reading
  • Hangouts hangs up: Google chat app shuts this year
    How many messaging services does this web giant need? It's gotta be over 9,000

    Google is winding down its messaging app Hangouts before it officially shuts in November, the web giant announced on Monday.

    Users of the mobile app will see a pop-up asking them to move their conversations onto Google Chat, which is yet another one of its online services. It can be accessed via Gmail as well as its own standalone application. Next month, conversations in the web version of Hangouts will be ported over to Chat in Gmail. 

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022