Bill Gates cried to make the world a better place

Meanwhile, Google pays for Linus Torvalds' breakfast


Radio Reg Is there a connection between an alleged coke-addicted CEO with a prostitute lair and open source? You bet there is - on Open Season.

Episode 18 of our fine show kicked off with a look at ex-Broadcom chief Henry Nicholas and his current travails with the legal system. If you've yet to hear about this story, you're in for a treat. I mean, really, how can you pass up on a underground hooker bunker?

As usual, Matt Asay and Dave Rosenberg joined yours truly on the program. And we were also graced with the presence of Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation. Jim is tasked with keeping Tux fat and making sure that Linus Torvalds can afford new sandals. He also champions Linux non-stop, as you'll hear.

Away from the drugs and whores, we explored what it takes to make Steve Ballmer cry, the value of EnterpriseDB and Facebook's embrace of the CPAL license. We also hit - again, sigh - on how Google is killing our brain.

Dave chimed in with a bit of a scoop too. Apparently, Bill Gates let some lass from 23 and Me have it when she tried to draw a link between vaccines and autism. Touchy stuff, I know. But Bill loves his vaccines.

We attempted to stop Zemlin from doing a Linux commercial and failed - miserably.

It should be noted that this show is a tad dated, which is my fault. Busy week. Also, I messed up and called it Episode 17 when it's really 18. I doubt any of you will notice, but there it is.

Now on with the show.

Open Season - Episode 18

The faithful can grab the Ogg Vorbis file here, those plagued by low-bandwidth can catch a smaller, crappier quality show here and those of you with macho-sized bandwidth can get the big daddy here.

You can subscribe to the show on iTunes here or grab the Arse feed here.

Show notes

  • Drugs, hookers and chips - Broadcom indictment
  • Ballmer and Gates clash helped make the world a better place
  • Jim goes on Linux Foundation tirade
  • Does anyone know how much Torvalds gets paid
  • Red Hat Exchange no longer an Exchange
  • EnterpriseDB scores Red Hat dude
  • Facebook does CPAL
  • Nick Carr says Google is eating our brains

Thanks for your ears. ®


Other stories you might like

  • SpaceX Starlink satellite streaks now present in nearly fifth of all astronomical images snapped by Caltech telescope

    Annoying, maybe – but totally ruining science, no

    SpaceX’s Starlink satellites appear in about a fifth of all images snapped by the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), a camera attached to the Samuel Oschin Telescope in California, which is used by astronomers to study supernovae, gamma ray bursts, asteroids, and suchlike.

    A study led by Przemek Mróz, a former postdoctoral scholar at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and now a researcher at the University of Warsaw in Poland, analysed the current and future effects of Starlink satellites on the ZTF. The telescope and camera are housed at the Palomar Observatory, which is operated by Caltech.

    The team of astronomers found 5,301 streaks leftover from the moving satellites in images taken by the instrument between November 2019 and September 2021, according to their paper on the subject, published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters this week.

    Continue reading
  • AI tool finds hundreds of genes related to human motor neuron disease

    Breakthrough could lead to development of drugs to target illness

    A machine-learning algorithm has helped scientists find 690 human genes associated with a higher risk of developing motor neuron disease, according to research published in Cell this week.

    Neuronal cells in the central nervous system and brain break down and die in people with motor neuron disease, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the baseball player who developed it. They lose control over their bodies, and as the disease progresses patients become completely paralyzed. There is currently no verified cure for ALS.

    Motor neuron disease typically affects people in old age and its causes are unknown. Johnathan Cooper-Knock, a clinical lecturer at the University of Sheffield in England and leader of Project MinE, an ambitious effort to perform whole genome sequencing of ALS, believes that understanding how genes affect cellular function could help scientists develop new drugs to treat the disease.

    Continue reading
  • Need to prioritize security bug patches? Don't forget to scan Twitter as well as use CVSS scores

    Exploit, vulnerability discussion online can offer useful signals

    Organizations looking to minimize exposure to exploitable software should scan Twitter for mentions of security bugs as well as use the Common Vulnerability Scoring System or CVSS, Kenna Security argues.

    Better still is prioritizing the repair of vulnerabilities for which exploit code is available, if that information is known.

    CVSS is a framework for rating the severity of software vulnerabilities (identified using CVE, or Common Vulnerability Enumeration, numbers), on a scale from 1 (least severe) to 10 (most severe). It's overseen by First.org, a US-based, non-profit computer security organization.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022