David Davis tells El Reg that Labour is 'mesmerised' by tech

Liberties sacrificed for 'an illusion'


“The vote on the Terror Bill – and the 42 day limit - was a line in the sand. Many of us felt that if we defeated the government on that, it would put the brakes on. But we didn’t.”

For someone written off by opponents as an eccentric, who jumped in a moment of madness, David Davis shows signs of having thought about these issues for a long time.

The one thing he is not is some wild-eyed “man of principle”. Certainly there is principle there: he clearly dislikes the gradual stripping away of habeas corpus. As he says in his blog: “We should only be keeping someone in jail without telling them what they are charged with for as short a period as is necessary.”

But that must be balanced against the need to protect the public. So he goes back to the evidence: and on the evidence he has seen so far, the absolute limit for such detention is somewhere between 21 and 28 days. The government, with its talk of 42 days, is doing nothing more than playing a numbers game: “talking tough on terror – and salami-slicing our freedoms away”.

So he has principles. But also, as befits someone with a degree in computer science, pragmatism and practicality. His chief charge against the government is one of naivety.

Intrusive, ineffective and expensive

“They are mesmerised by new technology. So they go for headlines that make it look as though they are doing something. But in the end, they don’t deliver.”

Unfortunately, the headlines are popular. “The public are seduced by New Labour hype – and only realise too late that what was promised was an illusion. Meanwhile, another traditional liberty has been reduced or abolished.”

On CCTV: “The current approach is the worst of all worlds – intrusive, ineffective and expensive. This government spent half a billion pounds on CCTV – one camera for every fourteen citizens. Yet police say 80 per cent of CCTV footage is unusable in court.”

On the DNA database: “We are filling it up with children and individuals who have committed no crime at all. Yet very large numbers of people who have committed crimes are not on it.”

What about security? This he sees as one of New Labour’s greatest confidence tricks, pretending that there is some sort of dichotomy between freedom and liberty. “In practice,” he argues, “the two go hand in hand. If you erode traditional freedoms and alienate immigrant communities, you reduce the flow of intelligence until, in the end, we are all less secure. Government should never forget that one of the most basic aims of any revolutionary is to force the state to act repressively. In this, Labour appears to be playing straight into the hands of terrorists.”

One gets the feeling that his is the sort of voice one would like to hear more of when it comes to debating new technology. He is no Luddite. He understands that change must come, and with it a re-evaluation of traditional values. But he also understands the consequences of being too gung-ho about technology.

On his future, David Davis is upbeat. He appears to have few regrets about scuppering a career at the heart of the next Conservative Government. “There is a great deal that a back bencher can achieve: there is a wide range of issues, from erosion of freedom through to social mobility that I would very much enjoy championing.”

Recent reports suggest that David Cameron may ask a re-elected David Davis to head up a commission on civil liberties. If he wishes to take it on, it feels like a role that may suit him very well indeed.

For further information on David Davis Campaign, go here


Other stories you might like

  • SpaceX Starlink satellite streaks now present in nearly fifth of all astronomical images snapped by Caltech telescope

    Annoying, maybe – but totally ruining science, no

    SpaceX’s Starlink satellites appear in about a fifth of all images snapped by the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), a camera attached to the Samuel Oschin Telescope in California, which is used by astronomers to study supernovae, gamma ray bursts, asteroids, and suchlike.

    A study led by Przemek Mróz, a former postdoctoral scholar at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and now a researcher at the University of Warsaw in Poland, analysed the current and future effects of Starlink satellites on the ZTF. The telescope and camera are housed at the Palomar Observatory, which is operated by Caltech.

    The team of astronomers found 5,301 streaks leftover from the moving satellites in images taken by the instrument between November 2019 and September 2021, according to their paper on the subject, published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters this week.

    Continue reading
  • AI tool finds hundreds of genes related to human motor neuron disease

    Breakthrough could lead to development of drugs to target illness

    A machine-learning algorithm has helped scientists find 690 human genes associated with a higher risk of developing motor neuron disease, according to research published in Cell this week.

    Neuronal cells in the central nervous system and brain break down and die in people with motor neuron disease, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the baseball player who developed it. They lose control over their bodies, and as the disease progresses patients become completely paralyzed. There is currently no verified cure for ALS.

    Motor neuron disease typically affects people in old age and its causes are unknown. Johnathan Cooper-Knock, a clinical lecturer at the University of Sheffield in England and leader of Project MinE, an ambitious effort to perform whole genome sequencing of ALS, believes that understanding how genes affect cellular function could help scientists develop new drugs to treat the disease.

    Continue reading
  • Need to prioritize security bug patches? Don't forget to scan Twitter as well as use CVSS scores

    Exploit, vulnerability discussion online can offer useful signals

    Organizations looking to minimize exposure to exploitable software should scan Twitter for mentions of security bugs as well as use the Common Vulnerability Scoring System or CVSS, Kenna Security argues.

    Better still is prioritizing the repair of vulnerabilities for which exploit code is available, if that information is known.

    CVSS is a framework for rating the severity of software vulnerabilities (identified using CVE, or Common Vulnerability Enumeration, numbers), on a scale from 1 (least severe) to 10 (most severe). It's overseen by First.org, a US-based, non-profit computer security organization.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022