Intel stinks

Fouling Arizona


Who let the ass out?

That's the question numerous residents in Chandler, Arizona are asking ever since a rotten egg type odor started haunting their homes. As it turns out, the stench comes from organic material collected in city-owned and, yes, Intel-built evaporation ponds. That's a big thanks then to Chipzilla for giving back to the community.

The Arizona Republic has captured tales of the sinus torture.

"The smell is so bad that now it's in my home," Heather Ondersma told the paper.

And Steve LeMay complained to the city council, "This is becoming unbearable. I can't stand to walk in my garage tonight."

The malodorous ponds in question hold purified waste water gushed out by Intel. Birds and other creatures now call the ponds at least a temporary home and do their business in the liquid. Add in some warm weather and wind, and you've got Intel-based ass gas coming right for you.

This wasn't a big deal a few years back because no one lived near the stank holes. But with Arizona's suburban sprawl taking place, some residents now find themselves right next to Intel's urination tanks.

Excellent corporate citizen that it is, Intel plans to build an aeration system - at its own expense no less - to put an end to the foul air.

Chandler residents say Intel's fix can't arrive soon enough, and many of them complain that they weren't properly warned about the true nature of Intel's waste puddles. ®

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