Apple confesses MobileMe vanishing contact bug

iPhone reset time


Apple is having yet another issue with its MobileMe service, although this time the problem is mercifully less substantial than having subscribers locked out of their accounts for more than a week.

A new glitch has made its presence known on Apple's MobileMe forums. Several users have complained today that various contact information on their devices has suddenly vanished.

According to reports, phone numbers, addresses, and e-mail contacts have disappeared - sometimes entirely, sometimes partially. In certain cases, data remains but without the proper context. For instance, a phone number might appear without the contact's name.

Apple posted notice on the MobileMe homepage that the issue has been addressed.

"Apple identified and resolved an issue with MobileMe Sync on iPhone and iPod touch," the company wrote. "Although no action is required by most members, some may need to reset their data from MobileMe to sync normally again."

To do this, users are instructed to follow steps 8 and 9 from this troubleshooting guide.

The solution involves that time-tested IT cure-all, the reset - both for the device and syncing command.

First, Apple tells users to turn off their iPhone or iPod touch and then back on. Follow that by disabling syncing, before re-enabling.

Meanwhile, Apple hasn't updated its status page reporting on the ongoing e-mail access problems since Sunday. In a posting made on Friday, Apple explained that a "serious problem" with one of its mail servers on July 18 that has blocked around one in 100 members from accessing their MobileMe mail accounts.

The mail glitch was third in a line of problems to hit MobileMe since its launch on July 9. Previous to that, Europeans who signed up for a free trial version of the service were billed before the gratis period was over, forcing Apple to issue refunds. ®


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