Servers buckle as Congress rejects $700bn Wall Street bailout

Microsoft assumes voice of reason


Following the US House of Representatives rejection of a $700bn the financial bailout bill and the ensuing stock market carnage, it's easy to overlook the unspoken victims of today's Wall Street meltdown.

We're referring, of course, to the machines running the House's official web site. Millions of individuals seeking information about the forsaken legislation have slowed its 10 servers to a crawl.

"We haven't had this much demand since the 9/11 commission report," a spokesman for the House sysadmin Jeff Ventura told the AP.

Site visitors eager for more information on the bill or wishing to email House members will endure fantastically reduced speeds while a tidal wave of packets jostle for attention.

Ventura said he expects the slowdown — which affects all House member websites — to last until Tuesday. He pledges technicians will be working through the night to help handle the massively increased traffic.

Other sites that eyeball US legislation have also taken a severe beating today. GovTrack.us was shut down late today, posting a message that read "so many people are searching for the economic relief bill that GovTrack can't handle it.

"Take a break and come back later when the world cools off!"

News sites such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal were also pummeled immediately following Congress' rejection of the bailout bill. ®

Microsoft calls bailout decision a critical error

In case you were wondering how Microsoft stands on the issue, it's not terribly pleased. Redmond said today the bill's failure to pass could result in a blue screen of death for the economy.

"Microsoft strongly urges members of the U.S. House of Representatives to reconsider and to support legislation that will re-instill confidence and stability in the financial markets," Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith said in a statement. "This legislation is vitally important to the health and preservation of jobs in all sectors of the economy of Washington State and the nation, and we urge Congress to act swiftly."

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