McKinnon suffers further legal setback in extradition fight

Fight continues as legal options dry up


Gary McKinnon has suffered another legal setback in his fight against extradition to the US on hacking charges.

The accused hacker has been refused a written judicial review of the Home Secretary's decision not to suspend extradition proceedings in light of his recent diagnosis with Asperger's Syndrome. McKinnon's lawyer, Karen Todner, has been given until 5 December to apply for an oral judicial review (ie a hearing in chambers).

The legal setback follows decisions by the House of Lords to deny his appeal against extradition and the European Court of Justice washing its hands of the case.

In related news, an early day motion calling for the Home Secretary to seek assurances that McKinnon will be allowed to serve any sentence imposed by a US court in a UK jail is gaining support.

Thirty-seven MPs have signed the early day motion calling on the UK government to take steps to safeguard McKinnon's health even if his long-running campaign to avoid extradition fails.

McKinnon faces seven charges of hacking into US government and military systems during 2001 and 2002. The former sys admin has never contested the charges, but argues he was motivated by curiosity about supposed US government suppression of knowledge about UFO-harvested technologies and contact with aliens rather than anything more malign.

He denies causing widespread damage and has expressed incredulity as the suggestion of US prosecutors that he was "the biggest military hacker of all time".

The London-based Scot's lawyers and legal team have run a three-year campaign arguing that McKinnon ought to be tried in the UK rather than extradited to the US, where he's likely to face a far longer sentence in harsher conditions. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Robotics and 5G to spur growth of SoC industry – report
    Big OEMs hogging production and COVID causing supply issues

    The system-on-chip (SoC) side of the semiconductor industry is poised for growth between now and 2026, when it's predicted to be worth $6.85 billion, according to an analyst's report. 

    Chances are good that there's an SoC-powered device within arm's reach of you: the tiny integrated circuits contain everything needed for a basic computer, leading to their proliferation in mobile, IoT and smart devices. 

    The report predicting the growth comes from advisory biz Technavio, which looked at a long list of companies in the SoC market. Vendors it analyzed include Apple, Broadcom, Intel, Nvidia, TSMC, Toshiba, and more. The company predicts that much of the growth between now and 2026 will stem primarily from robotics and 5G. 

    Continue reading
  • Deepfake attacks can easily trick live facial recognition systems online
    Plus: Next PyTorch release will support Apple GPUs so devs can train neural networks on their own laptops

    In brief Miscreants can easily steal someone else's identity by tricking live facial recognition software using deepfakes, according to a new report.

    Sensity AI, a startup focused on tackling identity fraud, carried out a series of pretend attacks. Engineers scanned the image of someone from an ID card, and mapped their likeness onto another person's face. Sensity then tested whether they could breach live facial recognition systems by tricking them into believing the pretend attacker is a real user.

    So-called "liveness tests" try to authenticate identities in real-time, relying on images or video streams from cameras like face recognition used to unlock mobile phones, for example. Nine out of ten vendors failed Sensity's live deepfake attacks.

    Continue reading
  • Lonestar plans to put datacenters in the Moon's lava tubes
    How? Founder tells The Register 'Robots… lots of robots'

    Imagine a future where racks of computer servers hum quietly in darkness below the surface of the Moon.

    Here is where some of the most important data is stored, to be left untouched for as long as can be. The idea sounds like something from science-fiction, but one startup that recently emerged from stealth is trying to turn it into a reality. Lonestar Data Holdings has a unique mission unlike any other cloud provider: to build datacenters on the Moon backing up the world's data.

    "It's inconceivable to me that we are keeping our most precious assets, our knowledge and our data, on Earth, where we're setting off bombs and burning things," Christopher Stott, founder and CEO of Lonestar, told The Register. "We need to put our assets in place off our planet, where we can keep it safe."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022