Virtual servers and economic gloom boost Wyse Technology's message

'Wyse up and toss those PCs'


Comment The recession is an opportunity for some. Wyse reckons it can boost its thin client business by pushing its thin client server running as a virtual machine overcoming Windows thin client inadequacies.

Replacing desktop PCs is the traditional Wyse story, now with added server virtualisation aspects and extra relevance because cash-conserving businesses can simply think about replacing their PC estate.

PCS with a red X in front of them

Jeff McNaught, the chief marketing officer for Wyse Technology, says Wyse is a counter-cyclical company because it makes more money when others in the IT industry are battening down their hatches and anticipating a spending downturn, like now.

He says: "Virtualisation has been a huge accelerator" on Wyse's business and his story goes like this: Microsoft's Terminal Services maintains a memory space partition for applications running on the terminals but each terminal's memory is not kept isolated from the others, which makes corruption possible. So you can use VMware to to run each session in a separate virtual machine which could run XP Professional or Vista plus terminal services. It uses RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol), he says, which means the end-point device is seen as more than a dumb terminal but not enough to be used by many knowledge workers.

McNaught says RDP doesn't support multiple screens - its peripheral support is poor as it's not aware of devices plugged into the end-point. It also doesn't support multimedia sound and video well and has no support for bi-directional sound.

Enter Wyse's thin client virtualisation software, which sits in a virtual machine and provides a kind of RDP+ which gives, he says, the full PC experience on Wyse thin client hardware. He adds that the Wyse thin client hardware, with Via or AMD microprocessors on board, is responsible for some sound and video processing which makes his company's thin client set-up better than HPs, which treats the end-point as "just a TV" and has the server do work that is off-loaded by Wyse onto the desktop thin clients.

This tasty dish sounds very well but the proof will be in the eating, and not every thing necessary to correct these claimed Windows Terminal Services faults is available from Wyse yet.

McNaught said that Wyse is working on its Project Renaissance technology, meaning a better thin client product, which will support dual-screen thin clients with 2560 x 1600 x 32-bit displays. The server component can support up to six of these displays. With that, McNaught claimed, "Basically, Wyse's thin client can substitute for any PC application you can think of".

For Wyse the recession is an opportunity to emphasise the traditional 'replace a $700 desktop PC with a $150 Wyse thin client' story. He piggybacks on virtualisation too by positioning the thin client server component as a way of overcoming what he says are Windows Terminal inadequacies and says that, pretty soon, Wyse's product can do anything a PC can.

McNaught could be right but, on the other hand, he could be just a wise guy. Check it out and see for yourself. ®

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Lonestar plans to put datacenters in the Moon's lava tubes
    How? Founder tells The Register 'Robots… lots of robots'

    Imagine a future where racks of computer servers hum quietly in darkness below the surface of the Moon.

    Here is where some of the most important data is stored, to be left untouched for as long as can be. The idea sounds like something from science-fiction, but one startup that recently emerged from stealth is trying to turn it into a reality. Lonestar Data Holdings has a unique mission unlike any other cloud provider: to build datacenters on the Moon backing up the world's data.

    "It's inconceivable to me that we are keeping our most precious assets, our knowledge and our data, on Earth, where we're setting off bombs and burning things," Christopher Stott, founder and CEO of Lonestar, told The Register. "We need to put our assets in place off our planet, where we can keep it safe."

    Continue reading
  • Conti: Russian-backed rulers of Costa Rican hacktocracy?
    Also, Chinese IT admin jailed for deleting database, and the NSA promises no more backdoors

    In brief The notorious Russian-aligned Conti ransomware gang has upped the ante in its attack against Costa Rica, threatening to overthrow the government if it doesn't pay a $20 million ransom. 

    Costa Rican president Rodrigo Chaves said that the country is effectively at war with the gang, who in April infiltrated the government's computer systems, gaining a foothold in 27 agencies at various government levels. The US State Department has offered a $15 million reward leading to the capture of Conti's leaders, who it said have made more than $150 million from 1,000+ victims.

    Conti claimed this week that it has insiders in the Costa Rican government, the AP reported, warning that "We are determined to overthrow the government by means of a cyber attack, we have already shown you all the strength and power, you have introduced an emergency." 

    Continue reading
  • China-linked Twisted Panda caught spying on Russian defense R&D
    Because Beijing isn't above covert ops to accomplish its five-year goals

    Chinese cyberspies targeted two Russian defense institutes and possibly another research facility in Belarus, according to Check Point Research.

    The new campaign, dubbed Twisted Panda, is part of a larger, state-sponsored espionage operation that has been ongoing for several months, if not nearly a year, according to the security shop.

    In a technical analysis, the researchers detail the various malicious stages and payloads of the campaign that used sanctions-related phishing emails to attack Russian entities, which are part of the state-owned defense conglomerate Rostec Corporation.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022