Samsung Pixon M8800 8Mp cameraphone

Worth a ponder if imaging performance is a priority


Face-to-face video calling is provided by a discreet secondary lower resolution camera above the display, but the main camera action is on the camera-like metal back panel. The 8Mp sensor has an automatic lens cover built in, ready to be fired up from the main menu or the dedicated camera button on the side.

On the opposite side of the phone, there are a Hold key and, above it, an application switcher. From standby, this pops up a small grid of six shortcut icons: call, music player, message, browser, main menu and back. At the bottom of the home screen there are four small buttons: keypad, phonebook, messages and menu.

Samsung Pixon M8800 8Mp cameraphone

The main feature is the 8Mp autofocus snapper

Like the Tocco, there’s an arrowed tab to the side of the display. Tap that, and a separate vertical tool bar pops out. This contains Samsung’s widgets – a selection of mini apps and functions that you can drag from the toolbar onto the main portion of the screen. Multiple widgets can be pulled over and rearranged with some fingertip action.

Samsung has expanded the line-up of widgets you can select from, introducing some that use online connectivity, such as an Accuweather weather forecast widget, Google Search and a More Widgets finder that lets you download new ones over the air.

In addition to the online set, the pre-loaded widget line-up includes various clock and calendar functions, music player, FM radio, image viewer, games, favourite contacts, birthday reminders, and a profile selector. And there’s a mirror widget – which uses the video call camera to give you a look at yourself onscreen.

You can scroll up and down the widgets toolbar with a swipe of the finger, and when you’re finished adding or removing widgets, you can close the bar with another tap of the arrowed tab.


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