Verizon predicts Kindle copycatting

If only people will make more phone calls


Verizon's head of device certification expects to see rivals to Amazon's Kindle launching on Verizon's network during 2009, once he has time to certify them.

Verizon started certifying devices for connection to its network last year following complaints of monopolistic control. Twenty-nine rather boring single-function devices have so far made the grade; including an electronic dip stick amongst others. Consumer products are taking longer, Verizon's Tony Lewis told Reuters, because their multi-function nature makes testing more complicated; but apparently lots of such devices will be certified, and launched, during 2009.

While the volume of calls and messaging continues to rise, the income it generates for network operators stubbornly fails to increase. This is putting pressure on the operators to find more innovative ways of using their bandwidth. Kindle is a masterstroke as most users don't even know it sports a mobile phone, connected to the Sprint network, though which it acquires published content over the air. That airtime is paid for by Amazon, who make up the income from the margin on books and magazine subscriptions, all managed by software from Qualcomm.

Operators would love to have more devices connected to their network, ideally without them having to bill users - at least not directly - so Lewis's endorsement of Kindle competitors is no surprise. What's more surprising is how long it's taking to get approval on consumer devices, given Vodafone's familiarity with the process in Europe and elsewhere.

Lewis is certainly in no doubt that a new generation of devices is on its way, citing the seven-week wait that anyone ordering a Kindle is expected to tolerate as proof of an unmet demand for electronic book readers - though those lacking an Oprah endorsement might not prove quite so popular. ®

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Will Lenovo ever think beyond hardware?
    Then again, why develop your own software à la HPE GreenLake when you can use someone else's?

    Analysis Lenovo fancies its TruScale anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform as a more flexible competitor to HPE GreenLake or Dell Apex. Unlike its rivals, Lenovo doesn't believe it needs to mimic all aspects of the cloud to be successful.

    While subscription services are nothing new for Lenovo, the company only recently consolidated its offerings into a unified XaaS service called TruScale.

    On the surface TruScale ticks most of the XaaS boxes — cloud-like consumption model, subscription pricing — and it works just like you'd expect. Sign up for a certain amount of compute capacity and a short time later a rack full of pre-plumbed compute, storage, and network boxes are delivered to your place of choosing, whether that's a private datacenter, colo, or edge location.

    Continue reading
  • Intel is running rings around AMD and Arm at the edge
    What will it take to loosen the x86 giant's edge stranglehold?

    Analysis Supermicro launched a wave of edge appliances using Intel's newly refreshed Xeon-D processors last week. The launch itself was nothing to write home about, but a thought occurred: with all the hype surrounding the outer reaches of computing that we call the edge, you'd think there would be more competition from chipmakers in this arena.

    So where are all the AMD and Arm-based edge appliances?

    A glance through the catalogs of the major OEMs – Dell, HPE, Lenovo, Inspur, Supermicro – returned plenty of results for AMD servers, but few, if any, validated for edge deployments. In fact, Supermicro was the only one of the five vendors that even offered an AMD-based edge appliance – which used an ageing Epyc processor. Hardly a great showing from AMD. Meanwhile, just one appliance from Inspur used an Arm-based chip from Nvidia.

    Continue reading
  • NASA's Psyche mission: 2022 launch is off after software arrives late
    Launch window slides into 2023 or 2024 for asteroid-probing project

    Sadly for NASA's mission to take samples from the asteroid Psyche, software problems mean the spacecraft is going to miss its 2022 launch window.

    The US space agency made the announcement on Friday: "Due to the late delivery of the spacecraft's flight software and testing equipment, NASA does not have sufficient time to complete the testing needed ahead of its remaining launch period this year, which ends on October 11."

    While it appears the software and testbeds are now working, there just isn't enough time to get everything done before a SpaceX Falcon Heavy sends the spacecraft to study a metallic-rich asteroid of the same name.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022