Programmers take to the clouds

Sure beats trolling the financial sites


The analysts at market researcher Evans Data, which spends its days obsessing about what programmers are up to, have released their Open Source Software/Linux Development 2008 report. The data compiled in the report is based on 360 interviews that the company did with software developers, and despite all the hype about cloud computing, a fairly significant number of open source developers say they plan to deploy their applications as Web services on one of several cloud computing providers.

Maybe they were just putting the pollers on? The people of Samoa kept a straight face when telling boldface lies about their lifestyle to anthropologist Margaret Mead, so there is some precedent of a people spontaneously getting their story straight for the sake of a good laugh. (There are many others, such as mortgage-backed securities. But let's not go there.)

According to the polls from Evans Data, 40 per cent of developers who are working on open source applications say they will put them on a cloud infrastructure of some sort. Google's App Engine, which allows Python applications to be deployed on Google's Web server iron and hit Google's own BigTable data storage, was the chosen platform by 28 per cent of those developers.

Amazon's Web Services, which includes the EC2 compute utility, the S3 storage utility, and a bunch of other stuff, was cited by 15 per cent. Developers also cited clouds from Microsoft (Azure, still in beta), Salesforce.com (AppExchange), and IBM (Blue Cloud) as platforms they were looking to deploy their applications too.

"As costs increase for power, staff, and data center resources, more businesses are being attracted to the latest promise: moving more of the company's infrastructure and applications into a third-party provided cloud," explained John Andrews, president and chief executive at Evans Data in a statement flogging the report. "Many companies are using this model to not only reduce infrastructure costs, but [to] simultaneously increase their computational capabilities."

To help sell the study, er, enlighten us some more, Evans Data sprinkled a few more nuggets of data on the announcement.

Some 52 per cent of developers polled in November said they use a virtualized instance of Linux (presumably, this was meant for development and test, not production environments). Just a little more than half of the developers also said they use the MySQL database, controlled by Sun Microsystems but still open source, in some of their projects, and two-thirds report that they use a SQL relational database of one kind or another (and either open or closed source) as the backend of their applications.

One in five programmers also reported that they use the Flex programming language, which is a Web 2.0-style language that occupies the same niche as JavaFX, AJAX, and Silverlight, among others. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Mega's unbreakable encryption proves to be anything but
    Boffins devise five attacks to expose private files

    Mega, the New Zealand-based file-sharing biz co-founded a decade ago by Kim Dotcom, promotes its "privacy by design" and user-controlled encryption keys to claim that data stored on Mega's servers can only be accessed by customers, even if its main system is taken over by law enforcement or others.

    The design of the service, however, falls short of that promise thanks to poorly implemented encryption. Cryptography experts at ETH Zurich in Switzerland on Tuesday published a paper describing five possible attacks that can compromise the confidentiality of users' files.

    The paper [PDF], titled "Mega: Malleable Encryption Goes Awry," by ETH cryptography researchers Matilda Backendal and Miro Haller, and computer science professor Kenneth Paterson, identifies "significant shortcomings in Mega’s cryptographic architecture" that allow Mega, or those able to mount a TLS MITM attack on Mega's client software, to access user files.

    Continue reading
  • HashiCorp tool sniffs out configuration drift
    OK, which of those engineers tweaked the settings? When infrastructure shifts away from state defined by original code

    HashiConf HashiCorp has kicked off its Amsterdam conference with a raft of product announcements, including a worthwhile look into infrastructure drift and a private beta for HCP Waypoint.

    The first, currently in public beta, is called Drift Detection for Terraform Cloud, and is designed to keep an eye on the state of an organization's infrastructure and notify when changes occur.

    Drift Detection is a useful thing, although an organization would be forgiven for thinking that buying into the infrastructure-as-code world of Terraform should mean everything should remain in the state it was when defined.

    Continue reading
  • End of the road for biz living off free G Suite legacy edition
    Firms accustomed to freebies miffed that web giant's largess doesn't last

    After offering free G Suite apps for more than a decade, Google next week plans to discontinue its legacy service – which hasn't been offered to new customers since 2012 – and force business users to transition to a paid subscription for the service's successor, Google Workspace.

    "For businesses, the G Suite legacy free edition will no longer be available after June 27, 2022," Google explains in its support document. "Your account will be automatically transitioned to a paid Google Workspace subscription where we continue to deliver new capabilities to help businesses transform the way they work."

    Small business owners who have relied on the G Suite legacy free edition aren't thrilled that they will have to pay for Workspace or migrate to a rival like Microsoft, which happens to be actively encouraging defectors. As noted by The New York Times on Monday, the approaching deadline has elicited complaints from small firms that bet on Google's cloud productivity apps in the 2006-2012 period and have enjoyed the lack of billing since then.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022