Kanye West blames Gmail hijack for bisexual porn hoax

Hey, world: Let him be great


Kanye West says someone has taken control of his Twitter. Not to mention his Gmail and MySpace accounts.

The rap star says that someone is using all three services to spread false reports, including one that claimed he was open to launching a new career as a bisexual porn star.

"Now somebody has been hacking into my MySpace and somebody's actually hacked into my personal Gmail account and has been emailing people from it," West wrote in a posting on his blog. "Hey world, I no longer have a Gmail!"

The ten-time Grammy award recipient disclosed the breaches as he tried to squelch the rumors that he was open to participating in bisexual porn. The report, which West vehemently denies, originated in what he said was a fake interview of him posted to AllHipHop.com. A variety of gossip magazines including Adult Video News, spotted the hoax and reported it as fact.

The episode comes a month after West claims someone hijacked his Twitter account and touched off a public feud with a certain faux television news commentator on the Comedy Central network by unleashing the words "Who the fuck is Stephen Colbert?"

In addition to the breaches of his Gmail, MySpace, and Twitter accounts, West claims he's discovered 12 unauthorized Skype accounts under his name.

The commandeering of accounts belonging to celebrities has grown increasingly common over the past few months. Earlier this month, Twitter had to temporarily suspend accounts belonging to Barack Obama, Britney Spears, and other celebrities after they were hijacked by miscreants and used to spread scandalous and false information that appeared to come from their owners. Wired.com later reported the security lapse was the result of a Twitter admin who used the word "happiness" as a password.

Facebook and MySpace have long been havens for scammers who compromise pages belonging to Alicia Keys and other stars to spread malware.

The latest incident was enough to cause West to plead for an end to it all.

"Please I beg you, give me a break!" West wrote in a blizzard of exclamation marks and capital letters. "Pleeeeeeeeeeeeease! Let me be great! Who have I hurt so bad that they want to destroy me? Who have I ever spoke about so negatively?" ®

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