DSA looks at 3D animated driving tests

Theory tests to get souped-up


The Driving Standards Agency is considering the use of three-dimensional animation in the driving theory test's hazard perception section.

Since 2002, theory tests – a precursor to a practical driving test – have included 14 videos, during which candidates have to click on a mouse when they see a developing hazard. Higher marks are awarded for spotting the hazards early.

According to a tender published on 9 February 2009 in the Official Journal of the European Union, the DSA wants to assess whether three dimensional animation technology could be used for the current hazard perception test, and a planned second phase which would assess a candidate's response to dangers.

It is also interested in how the technology could be used in situational judgement and case study questions, and assessing public acceptability of tests using 3D animation (3DA).

The DSA plans to complete the first two stages of the project, which involve testing the validity of animated clips then – if that is successful – implementing 3DA test items within 18 months.

"Depending on the results (of the research), the commission could be extended to investigate other possibilities for 3DA in connection with driver training and assessment," the tender notice adds.

In a separate tender issued on the same date, NHS Education for Scotland is seeking three and two dimensional digital visualisation of human anatomy, incorporating haptic technology, which simulates the touching of objects for users. It expects to pay £1.5m over three years for a framework contract supporting a work programme.

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

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