Developers more 'satisfied' with PHP than other codes

Ease of use plus no unpleasant aftertaste


You down with PHP? (Yeah, and Ruby)

The surveying snoops at Evans Data say developers that use PHP are more satisfied with the scripting language overall than those who program with Ruby, Perl, Javascript, Flex, and VB script.

Evans Data said it polled over 500 developers and IT professionals world-wide, asking them to rank the features and options of scripting languages they have personally used. It asked respondents to judge the languages on 12 characteristics such as ease of use, exception handling, security, client-side scripting, and the coding community.

The overall scripting crown and scepter went to PHP, winning the top spot most categories. Ruby took second place overall with top marks in ease of use, which also was what most coders said is the most important feature to win their hearts. Python arrived in third place with the high score in the extensibility category.

From the survey's report:

Overall, most of these languages have their merits and their drawbacks. Ruby users are convinced it is the easiest to use and that development in Ruby proceeds much faster than in other languages. It is object oriented and supports code reusability, so developers should be able to write programs that can be maintained and extended. However, the Ruby community is very small and despite the hype of Ruby during the last two or three years, its market penetration has been feeble and it's not easy to find Ruby developers – which is potentially a big problem.

Evans Data calls Python users "enthusiastic," and says the language's best attributes support the creation of relatively large and complex applications. It adds that while the Python developer community is small, it's shown signs of growing over the last couple of years. Plus Google uses Python, so it has to be cool.

But both lost in the overall score to PHP, which Evans Data says has the second largest community of scripting-language users behind JavaScript. The market-research firm dubs PHP the de facto workhorse of the web for its strong set of tools and developers that are "plentiful and easy to find."

The least-satisfied coders overall according to the survey, are those using Microsoft's VBScript.

Each category was ranked on a scale of 1-5 (image courtesy Evans Data)

The three winning languages broken down into categories are:

  • Ease of Use: Ruby, PHP, Flex
  • Exception Handling: Ruby, Python, Powershell
  • Extensibility: Python, PHP, Perl
  • Maintainability/Readability: Ruby, PHP, Python
  • Cross-platform Portability: PHP, Ruby, Python
  • Community: Ruby, PHP, Javascript
  • Availability of Tools: PHP, Ruby, VB Script
  • Quality of Tools: PHP, Flex, Python
  • Performance: PHP, Perl, Python
  • Memory Management: Python, Perl, Flex
  • Client-side Scripting: Javascript, Ruby, Windows Powershell
  • Security: Microsoft F#, PHP, Ruby

A gratis full copy of the report is available here (PDF) assuming you don't mind entering some personal data first. ®

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Researchers find 134 flaws in the way Word, PDFs, handle scripts
    ‘Cooperative mutation’ spots problems that checking code alone will miss

    Black Hat Asia Security researchers have devised a tool that detects flaws in the way apps like Microsoft Word and Adobe Acrobat process JavaScript, and it's proven so effective they've found 134 bugs – 59 of them considered worthy of a fix by vendors, 33 assigned a CVE number, and 17 producing bug bounty payments totaling $22,000.

    The tool is named "Cooper" – a reference to the "Cooperative mutation" technique employed by the tool.

    Speaking at the Black Hat Asia conference in Singapore, PhD student Xu Peng of the Chinese Academy of Sciences – one of the tool's co-authors – explained that the likes of Word and Acrobat accept input from scripting languages. Acrobat, for example, allows JavaScript to manipulate PDF files.

    Continue reading
  • Google shows off immersive maps, AR-flavored search, Pixel 7, and more
    Your essential de-hyped guide to what the Chocolate Factory teased at developer shindig

    Google IO Google I/O, the ad biz's annual developer conference, returned to the Shoreline Amphitheater in California's Mountain View on Wednesday, for the first time in three years. The gathering remained largely a remote event due to the persistence of COVID-19 though there were enough Googlers, partners, and assorted software developers in attendance to fill venue seats and punctuate important points with applause.

    Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google parent Alphabet, opened the keynote by sounding familiar themes. He leaned into the implied sentiment, "We're here to help," an increasingly iffy proposition in light of the many controversies facing the company.

    He said he wanted to explain how Google is advancing its mission in two ways, "by deepening our understanding of information so that we can turn it into knowledge and advancing the state of computing so that knowledge is easier to access no matter who or where you are."

    Continue reading
  • Half of developers still at screens even during breaks
    Going for a walk: Good. Doomscrolling: Bad

    What are your peers doing to stave off burnout? Research from Stack Overflow suggests about half of developers are still spending their breaks in front of a screen.

    The Q&A programming resource surveyed 800 devs, and found most of the top five things they do when they need a break involve screens: listening to music (46 percent), visiting Stack Overflow (41 percent), browsing social media (37 percent), and watching videos (36 percent).

    Actually talking with fellow humans did not make the top five, and 4 percent of respondents had some other outlet for stress (possibly angrily banging some really terse comments into the source).

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022