Mozilla update quashes nine bugs

Critical memory corruption bug stars in update


Mozilla released an updated version of Firefox on Tuesday that addressed nine security flaws, one of which earns the dreaded 'critical' rating.

The critical flaw addressed by Firefox 3.09 involves a memory corruption problem. The two "high-risk" flaws involve same-origin violation security bugs. The other six moderate or low risk flaws are detailed in Mozilla's release notes here.

Firefox 3.0.9 also addresses a number of stability issues, including a problem where a corrupt local database might cause Firefox to "lose" its stored cookies. Another flaw that means in-line images might not be displayed when using webmail accounts was also plugged.

User systems are to be automatically updated to version 3.0.9 within 48 hours. The release can also be downloaded manually beforehand. Firefox version 2.0 is no longer supported.

The update to Firefox version 3.0.9 comes days before the expected delivery of an "almost ready" fourth beta of the next version of its browser, Firefox 3.5. ®


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