Android-based tablet PC spied online

SkyTone’s Alpha 680


Several firms have already begun talking-up Android-based laptops, but now a quirky PC manufacturer’s stuck its neck out and launched its own model.

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SkyTone's Android-based Alpha 680

Although images of SkyTone’s Alpha 680 tablet PC don’t really say much about how Android looks and feel away from a mobile phone, the firm assures potential customers that it’s a real Android PC by… well… sticking the OS’ green robot logo all over its pictures.

Android aside, the 7in Alpha 680 is a very basic machine. It has 128MB of DDR 2 memory and, despite being fitted with a solid-state drive, storage capacity tops out at 1GB.

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A basic tablet, at best

The machine is based around an 533MHz ARM11 CPU and comes with an Ethernet port, integrated Wi-Fi, two USB 2.0 ports and an SD memory card slot.

SkyTone’s Alpha 680 is available to buy in China, but a price hasn’t been mentioned. ®

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