Amazon cloud welcomes airplanes of data

Send 747 through mail, please


Amazon's cloud is infinitely large. At least in theory. But bandwidth to the cloud is not. If you like, you could upload a full terabyte of data to that data center in the sky. But even over a T1 connection, it would take you a good 80 days.

Amazon realizes that's a long time, so it's now giving you the option of sending your data via mail. Not email - mail mail.

Over at the Amazon Web Services blog, the company has unveiled a new service it calls AWS Import/Export. You mail in your storage device, and Amazon uploads all that data for you.

"Customers with AWS storage requirements at the terabyte and petabyte level often ask us if they can sidestep the internet and simply send us a disk drive, or even a 747 full of such drives," writes Amazon cloud guru Jeff Barr. "I can now say 'Yes, you can!'"

That would be a Boeing 747.

At the moment, Import/Export is a limited beta. And Amazon is only accepting drives with USB 2.0 or eSATA connectors, formatted in FAT32, ext2, ext3, or NTFS. The cloud is set to handle sub-50-pound drives that fit into an 8U rack - but if you ask, it may accommodate other drives.

Barr even says you can ship a SAN. But give him a call first.

Amazon won't upload unreadable files or files larger than 5GB. But it'll send you a log file letting you know what was rejected and what wasn't. And when it's finished, it'll send your drive back home at no expense.

Security? You can encrypt your files but not your file systems. And Amazon says it's trustworthy: "We track custody of your device from the time it arrives in our mailroom until it is shipped back to you. All personnel involved in the process have undergone extensive background checks."

You can sign up for the beta here. It's only available in the US, but Amazon plans on expanding to Europe "in the near future."

Currently, Import/Export doesn't do exports. But it will. Downloading a terabyte takes just as long. ®


Keep Reading

Google, Amazon pass on UK Digital Services Tax by hiking ad prices, fees at same rate the government takes

Which means you get to pay, because cost of ads, sellers' fee hikes are built into prices, so once the tech titans charge more ... you get the drift

If you're on invite-only tech-testing scheme, take care with Amazon's Alexa-powered answer to Google's Glass

iFixit reveals repair won't be trivial

Amazon and Google: Trust us, our smart-speaker apps are carefully policed. Boffins: Yes, well, about that...

Who can you trust these days?

Remind us again, why work for AWS? Petty Amazon sues marketing veep after he defects to Google Cloud

Hyperscalers spar in non-compete, NDA spat

Stop asking for Amazon, Google and Microsoft cloud with 'no justification': US Library of Congress told to drop its 'brand-name'-tastic RFP

Oracle wins protest after agency failed to get it kicked out for not being a reseller

Google's cloud-wrangling Anthos completes bridge to Amazon Web Services, Azure waits in the wings

Meanwhile, Chocolate Factory to donate its Istio toolkit to vendor-neutral open-source foundation

UK govt publishes contracts granting Amazon, Microsoft, Google and AI firms access to COVID-19 health data

Questions linger over involvement of biz linked to Dominic Cummings and Vote Leave campaign

Big Tech to face its Ma Bell moment? US House Dems demand break-up of 'monopolists' Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google

'These once scrappy, underdog startups have become the kinds of monopolies we last saw in the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons'

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020