Network Solutions breach exposed 500k card accounts

The case of the 3-month hack


A breach at Network Solutions has exposed details for more than 500,000 credit and debit cards after hackers penetrated a system it used to deliver e-commerce services and planted software that diverted transactions to a rogue server, the hosting company said late Friday.

The unauthorized software was in place from March 12 to June 8 and affected transactions Network Solutions processed on behalf of 4,343 merchant websites that mostly belonged to small businesses, spokeswoman Susan Wade said. While the company discovered the software in early June, it waited until the close of business Friday to disclose the breach. Wade said it took until July 13 for forensics investigators to crack the code and understand how it worked.

"We have been working around the clock to get this announcement ready," she told The Register. "We're really making an effort to be forthcoming. This is really tough on our customers that were impacted, and we feel very badly."

Network Solutions is working with undisclosed law enforcement agencies to figure out who is responsible for the breach and how it happened. In all details for 573,928 card holders may have been siphoned in the attack, which affected different merchant websites at different times over the three-month period that the rogue software was in place.

So far, there are no indications that any of the exposed cards have been misused.

Network Solutions has offered to foot the bill for notifying affected cardholders so those costs don't have to be born by the merchants who used the company's e-commerce service. In Most US states, laws require such notices to be made when breaches are discovered that expose credit card information.

The company is also making 12 months of fraud-monitoring services available free of charge to cardholders whose information was exposed. Affected merchants and cardholders can enroll by visiting this site, which walks them through the process. ®

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Facebook phishing campaign nets millions in IDs and cash
    Hundreds of millions of stolen credentials and a cool $59 million

    An ongoing phishing campaign targeting Facebook users may have already netted hundreds of millions of credentials and a claimed $59 million, and it's only getting bigger.

    Identified by security researchers at phishing prevention company Pixm in late 2021, the campaign has only been running since the final quarter of last year, but has already proven incredibly successful. Just one landing page - out of around 400 Pixm found - got 2.7 million visitors in 2021, and has already tricked 8.5 million viewers into visiting it in 2022. 

    The flow of this phishing campaign isn't unique: Like many others targeting users on social media, the attack comes as a link sent via DM from a compromised account. That link performs a series of redirects, often through malvertising pages to rack up views and clicks, ultimately landing on a fake Facebook login page. That page, in turn, takes the victim to advert landing pages that generate additional revenue for the campaign's organizers. 

    Continue reading
  • Never fear, the White House is here to tackle web trolls
    'No one should have to endure abuse just because they are attempting to participate in society'

    A US task force aims to prevent online harassment and abuse, with a specific focus on protecting women, girls and LGBTQI+ individuals.

    In the next 180 days, the White House Task Force to Address Online Harassment and Abuse will, among other things, draft a blueprint on a "whole-of-government approach" to stopping "technology-facilitated, gender-based violence." 

    A year after submitting the blueprint, the group will provide additional recommendations that federal and state agencies, service providers, technology companies, schools and other organisations should take to prevent online harassment, which VP Kamala Harris noted often spills over into physical violence, including self-harm and suicide for victims of cyberstalking as well mass shootings.

    Continue reading
  • Abortion rights: US senators seek ban on sale of health location data
    With Supreme Court set to overturn Roe v Wade, privacy is key

    A group of senators wants to make it illegal for data brokers to sell sensitive location and health information of individuals' medical treatment.

    A bill filed this week by five senators, led by Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), comes in anticipation the Supreme Court's upcoming ruling that could overturn the 49-year-old Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing access to abortion for women in the US.

    The worry is that if the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. Wade – as is anticipated following the leak in May of a majority draft ruling authored by Justice Samuel Alito – such sensitive data can be used against women.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022