Windows 7 finds home at Intel

Microsoft's new OS 'one big positive'


Good news for Microsoft: Intel is looking forward to installing Windows 7 on the computers of its own employees.

Intel was arguably the most visible corporation that decided to skip Vista. And it was by no means lonely in its decision.

But Windows 7, it appears, will receive a friendlier welcome. At a Technology Summit with reporters and analysts today in San Francisco, Intel's EVP and chief sales and marketing officer Sean Maloney was asked whether Chipzilla would wait for the first Windows 7 service pack before it began deploying it to its employees.

"This time I think we'll go faster," said Maloney.

The company's top salesman also sympathized with those who passed on Vista. "There was an excuse not to deploy Vista, because - rightly or wrongly - people said 'wait for service pack X' or 'we don't like the compatibility issues.'"

But this time out, Maloney said, "There are really good reasons for the business client in terms of security, power management - lots of good reasons why you'd go for it."

Surveying the rows of laptop-using attendees, he added, "I'm sure half the people in the room are using it already - it looks really robust. You've got compatibility mode, which takes away a bunch of those arguments, so I think it's all positive."

The compatibility mode to which Maloney was referring, however, is less than a total panacea. As The Reg has noted, for an Intel box to run Windows 7's XP Mode, its CPU must support Intel's Virtualisation Technology, and you'll need to turn on that support in the BIOS. And unfortunately, many Intel multicore chips don't support Intel VT.

And then there are all those older PCs. Maloney estimates that in the US and Western Europe "there are hundreds of millions of units that are three-years-plus old." Intel VT was introduced in 2005, so most of those those "plus old" PCs are S.O.L.

But Maloney wants companies to upgrade their PCs to run Windows 7. "Now the question is," he said, "can we get the argument to the CFOs and the CEOs that it makes more sense to spend a little bit on capital to reduce your operating costs?"

And he's clear on the answer to that question: "We think it makes overwhelming sense if you have a three-year-old PC to replace the thing, for security violations, virus, power consumption, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera - and Windows 7 is just one big positive."

The upgrade-or-not question will be answered in the next few months, according to Maloney. "Spending decisions get made in September, October, and November. And last September, October, and November, the IT managers who wanted to buy equipment we're rapped over their knuckles by their CFOs and CEOs, and their budgets were cut.

"All those decisions are going to get made in the next three months ... and if CEOs and CFOs think that their aging, rusty old equipment should get replaced because it's more efficient to do so, then you're going to see an uptick in IT spending. If they don't, then IT spending is not going to recover."

So check back in a few months, and we'll know if the IT segment of the Meltdown will be over - and whether Windows 7 has been embraced by Intel. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Millions of people's info stolen from MGM Resorts dumped on Telegram for free
    Meanwhile, Twitter coughs up $150m after using account security contact details for advertising

    Miscreants have dumped on Telegram more than 142 million customer records stolen from MGM Resorts, exposing names, postal and email addresses, phone numbers, and dates of birth for any would-be identity thief.

    The vpnMentor research team stumbled upon the files, which totaled 8.7 GB of data, on the messaging platform earlier this week, and noted that they "assume at least 30 million people had some of their data leaked." MGM Resorts, a hotel and casino chain, did not respond to The Register's request for comment.

    The researchers reckon this information is linked to the theft of millions of guest records, which included the details of Twitter's Jack Dorsey and pop star Justin Bieber, from MGM Resorts in 2019 that was subsequently distributed via underground forums.

    Continue reading
  • DuckDuckGo tries to explain why its browsers won't block some Microsoft web trackers
    Meanwhile, Tails 5.0 users told to stop what they're doing over Firefox flaw

    DuckDuckGo promises privacy to users of its Android, iOS browsers, and macOS browsers – yet it allows certain data to flow from third-party websites to Microsoft-owned services.

    Security researcher Zach Edwards recently conducted an audit of DuckDuckGo's mobile browsers and found that, contrary to expectations, they do not block Meta's Workplace domain, for example, from sending information to Microsoft's Bing and LinkedIn domains.

    Specifically, DuckDuckGo's software didn't stop Microsoft's trackers on the Workplace page from blabbing information about the user to Bing and LinkedIn for tailored advertising purposes. Other trackers, such as Google's, are blocked.

    Continue reading
  • Despite 'key' partnership with AWS, Meta taps up Microsoft Azure for AI work
    Someone got Zuck'd

    Meta’s AI business unit set up shop in Microsoft Azure this week and announced a strategic partnership it says will advance PyTorch development on the public cloud.

    The deal [PDF] will see Mark Zuckerberg’s umbrella company deploy machine-learning workloads on thousands of Nvidia GPUs running in Azure. While a win for Microsoft, the partnership calls in to question just how strong Meta’s commitment to Amazon Web Services (AWS) really is.

    Back in those long-gone days of December, Meta named AWS as its “key long-term strategic cloud provider." As part of that, Meta promised that if it bought any companies that used AWS, it would continue to support their use of Amazon's cloud, rather than force them off into its own private datacenters. The pact also included a vow to expand Meta’s consumption of Amazon’s cloud-based compute, storage, database, and security services.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022