IBM Rational adds new ties for devs

System-on-a-chip sim


IBM has introduced a fresh batch of updates and software to their portfolio made to help software developers and systems engineers integrate different business processes into its Rational platform.

The rollout includes updates to IBM Rational System Architect, DOORS Web Access and Rhapsody, as well as making Rational Software Architect play well with Websphere. IBM is also introducing a new test-and-simulation environment especially for system-on-a-chip manufacturers.

Greg Gorman, a program director for the Rational Software line, said the focus of the launch is to add capabilities to allow more systems-to-systems modeling.

Version 11.3.1 of Rational System Architect, IBM's software for visualizing and analyzing an organization's IT architecture and processes, adds two-way integration with Rational Focal Point, which maps product and portfolio management for project managers. The update also adds support for The Open Group Architecture Framework version 9 (TOGAF 9), a top industry framework for enterprise architecture deployment.

The updated Rational DOORS Web Access version 1.3 adds a requirements editing feature (from its former read-and-review restriction) to make it simpler for additional members to contribute and validate requirements. It also adds the ability to create traceability links and view requirement changes, according to Gorman.

An update to IBM Rational Rhapsody include features to let a development team and quality assurance to share and manage requirements and test information. Taking aim at the automotive industry, IBM has also enabled definition of application software for Automotive Open System Architecture (AUTOSAR) systems and provides a Japanese-language version of Rhapsody. IBM intends to add more native language capabilities to Rhapsody going forward, but Japanese was its first move (logically because it's the only country really making cars these days.

IBM Rational Software Architect version 7.5.4 adds ties to the Big Blue's Websphere line. The company said it will help developers who have little or no service oriented architecture (SOA) experience develop SOA solutions and use them to connect and support distributed smart devices. It also adds support to designing and delivering new communication services like "click-to-call" features and integrated VoIP and video.

New to the Rational product lineup is IBM's Enterprise Verification Management Solution, or EVMS. IBM said the offering provides a complete software lifecycle management solution for designers of integrated circuits for consumer electronics by allowing them to use hardware simulators to run software on a virtual chip before the actual chip exists.

All the products are available now, with the exception of Rational System Architect 11.3.1 which is scheduled for release later this month. ®


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