Intel profits surge towards heavens

An 875 per cent leap (with caveats)


Intel has reported fourth-quarter revenue of $10.6bn, a 28 per cent rise from the same quarter last year. Operating income for the quarter was $2.5 billion and net income $2.3bn, topping Wall Street estimates.

That net income increase was a brawny 875 per cent improvement year-on-year, a $2bn rise. But as impressive as these figures may sound, the fourth quarter of 2008 was exceptionally execrable for Chipzilla, with profits in that quarter diving a full 90 per cent, not only because of the heinous condition of the world tech market at that time, but also due to Intel's $1bn write-off of its stake in the WiMax service provider Clearwire.

But still, $2.3bn isn't exactly chump change.

Referring to today's report (PDF), Intel CFO Stacy Smith said (PDF): "The fourth quarter was a strong ending to a year with a very difficult beginning."

Smith credited "a healthy holiday selling season" as one factor in the $10.6bn revenue figure, a 13 per cent growth that he characterized as "nearly twice the average seasonal sequential growth seen in the fourth quarter." He also noted that the 28 per cent revenue rise was "the largest percent increase in over 10 years."

Smith also projected that revenue for the current quarter will be $9.7bn, with plus-or-minus wiggle room of $400M. Although the center point of that projection would be 8 per cent below the just-finished quarter, Smith characterized that drop as "consistent with the average historical seasonal decrease."

In a canned statement, Intel CEO Paul Otellini said: "Our ability to weather this business cycle demonstrates that microprocessors are indispensable in our modern world. Looking forward, we plan to deliver the benefits of computing to an expanding set of products, markets and customers."

Intel's shares jumped over 2.7 per cent after the announcement to $22.07 per share before settling back to $21.45 at close of markets. ®

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • AMD claims its GPUs beat Nvidia on performance per dollar
    * Terms, conditions, hardware specs and software may vary – a lot

    As a slowdown in PC sales brings down prices for graphics cards, AMD is hoping to win over the market's remaining buyers with a bold, new claim that its latest Radeon cards provide better performance for the dollar than Nvidia's most recent GeForce cards.

    In an image tweeted Monday by AMD's top gaming executive, the chip designer claims its lineup of Radeon RX 6000 cards provide better performance per dollar than competing ones from Nvidia, with all but two of the ten cards listed offering advantages in the double-digit percentages. AMD also claims to provide better performance for the power required by each card in all but two of the cards.

    Continue reading
  • Google opens the pod doors on Bay View campus
    A futuristic design won't make people want to come back – just ask Apple

    After nearly a decade of planning and five years of construction, Google is cutting the ribbon on its Bay View campus, the first that Google itself designed.

    The Bay View campus in Mountain View – slated to open this week – consists of two office buildings (one of which, Charleston East, is still under construction), 20 acres of open space, a 1,000-person event center and 240 short-term accommodations for Google employees. The search giant said the buildings at Bay View total 1.1 million square feet. For reference, that's less than half the size of Apple's spaceship. 

    The roofs on the two main buildings, which look like pavilions roofed in sails, were designed that way for a purpose: They're a network of 90,000 scale-like solar panels nicknamed "dragonscales" for their layout and shimmer. By scaling the tiles, Google said the design minimises damage from wind, rain and snow, and the sloped pavilion-like roof improves solar capture by adding additional curves in the roof. 

    Continue reading
  • Pentester pops open Tesla Model 3 using low-cost Bluetooth module
    Anything that uses proximity-based BLE is vulnerable, claim researchers

    Tesla Model 3 and Y owners, beware: the passive entry feature on your vehicle could potentially be fooled by a new form of relay attack.

    Discovered and tested by researchers at NCC Group, the attack allows anyone with a tool similar to NCC's to relay the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) signal from a smartphone that has been paired with a Tesla back to the vehicle. Far from simply unlocking the door, the hack lets the attacker start the car and drive away too.

    In its testing, NCC Group said it was able to perform a relay attack that allowed researchers to open a Tesla Model 3 from a home in which the vehicle's paired device was located (on the other side of the house), approximately 25 meters away.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022