Tandberg goes atomic on NAS

Dedupe, iSCSI and NAS, oh my


Tandberg Data has announced a deduping Atom-powered NAS/iSCSI box for its channel along with deduplication software.

The DPS2000 is a 4-bay storage box in table-top or rackmount enclosure form. It's powered by an Intel Atom processor and the Linux software provides concurrent iSCSI block access as well as the CIFS, NFS and AFP filer functions.

The DPS2142 is the 1U rackmount model with 4 X 2TB hot-swap SATA drives. The D510 Atom comes with 1GB DDRII RAM and 128MB flash. Connectivity is via gigabit Ethernet and 3 X USB 2.0 ports. RAID levels 0, 1, 5 and 6 are supported.

A DPS2142 is a 4TB model in either the desktop or 1U rackmount form factors with the other details being the same. One DPS can replicate blocks to a remote one.

Tanberg says file-level volumes can be used for file sharing, D2D (disk-to-disk) backup and IP video surveillance. The RAID configuration of the DPS2000 NAS allows users to increase capacity through physical HDD migration. In other words, take out a 1TB drive and replace it with a 2TB drive, with the existing data automatically written on to it. This is a Drobo-like capability.

The DPS software includes bundled AccuGard, which is Windows-based and does source deduplication, backup and restore.

This is OEM'd from Colorado-based Data Storage Group (dataStor) and its ds Shield Professional Single Server product. This company was founded in 2005 and has developed a sub-file level deduplication technology which is claimed to offer a 20:1 deduplication ratio and run on notebooks as well as groups of enterprise servers.

Data is deduplicated before being backed up and backups are schedulable. The data can also be encrypted.

Tandberg is also offering the software with its removable disk RDX QuikStor products, meaning that their cost per stored GB is reduced, perhaps by as much as 20 times if AccuGard dedupes as is claimed. This would make them more attractive cost-wise compared to SMB tape alternatives, such as DAT which Tandberg also supplies.

The maximum capacity QuikStor cartridge contains a 640GB disk. Whack this up by, say, ten times and we have a 6.4TB removable drive.

Tandberg may offer a grouped server version of ds Shield technology in its next Accugard release.

The low-end NAS/iSCSI storage space has seen a lot of recent activity, with Overland Storage adding iSCSI SAN functions to its SnapServer NAS family. Iomega has its Marvell-powered, 4-bay StorCenter boxes too.

The DPS2000 will ship in March, come with AccuGard, with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price MSRP) from $2,290 for 4TB. Its MSRP for the RDX QuikStor with AccuGuard, also shipping in March, starts at $169 (drive only), with cartridge prices ranging from $126 for 80GB, to $413 for the 640GB drive. ®


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