Fanboi Opera lovers get 10.5 beta

Mini on the iPhone? Still waiting


You still can't run Opera on the iPhone. But Opera-loving Apple fanbois can take some comfort from the fact that a beta version of the Norwegian browser maker's latest desktop creation is now available for the Mac.

The company released its Opera 10.5 Mac beta Thursday morning. The new build runs on Mac OS 10.4 - Tiger - as well as newer versions of Apple's desktop operating system.

Opera 10.5 includes the company's revamped JavaScript engine, dubbed Carakan - the new Opera Widgets for desktop, which lets those third-party mini-apps run on the desktop even when the browser is closed - and support for the still-gestating HTML5 video standard. Like Mozilla's Firefox, Opera uses the free and open Ogg Theora video codec with the HTML5 video tag.

Built with Apple's Cocoa framework, the browser also offers what Opera calls "better integration" with the Mac OS. This includes support for Growl, which can serve up desktop notifications from the app.

What's more, there's a unified toolbar, support for multi-touch gestures on compatible MacBooks and MacBook Pros, and private tabs and windows that anonymize data sent over the wire.

Though the beta supports Mac OS 10.4, it won't run on PowerPC-based Tiger machines. And Opera acknowledges that the beta has "minimal Java support" and "some Widget keyboard and window issues."

You can download the new build here.

Earlier this month, Opera demoed a version of its Opera Mini mobile browser for the iPhone, but it has yet to actually submit the browser to the iPhone App Store, a company representative confirmed Thursday. Currently, Apple does allow third-party browsers into the App Store, but only if they use the same WebKit rendering engine as its own Safari browser.

Apple's SDK forbids applications from executing their own code unless they use Apple's APIs or interpreters. But Opera Mini does not appear to violate this rule.

Opera Mini is typically a Java application. But the iPhone incarnation is a native app, and like other versions of Opera Mini, it taps into proxy servers that intercept and compress webpages before sending them down to the client. This speeds download times, but it also means that client browser does not run its own webcode. ®

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Opera loses Touch with iOS app: Browser maker locks and loads the rebrandogun
    It's just 'Opera on iOS' now

    Opera has pushed out an update for its iOS browser, dropping the "Touch" in Opera Touch to become just plain old Opera on iOS.

    The company is approaching the third anniversary of Touch although it has a longer history of browsing on the move: Mobile editions turned up more than 20 years ago for Psion devices followed by updates for Symbian and eventually a Chromium edition for Android users. iDevice users must make do with the guts of Safari, as per Apple's rules.

    As with the iOS versions of Microsoft's Edge, Google's Chrome, Vivaldi and so on, Opera has attempted to differentiate itself via the bits around the core rendering engine (what the company refers to as "the personal browser experience"). As well as the ad and cookie blocking that has become common among browsers, Opera added its Flow technology to the mobile browser at its 2018 launch to facilitate the sharing of files between desktop and device.

    Continue reading
  • JavaScript-based address bar spoofing vulns patched in Safari, Yandex, Opera
    Are you where you think you are, or are you where I want you to think you are?

    Rapid7 found Apple’s Safari browser, as well as the Opera Mini and Yandex browsers, were vulnerable to JavaScript-based address bar spoofing.

    The infosec outfit, along with its “longtime mobile hacker friend Rafay Baloch,” discovered the software could be tricked into displaying the URL of one website while loading and displaying content from another. Such trickery is useful to, among others, thieves and fraudsters who might want to replace a bank’s online login page with one designed to harvest unwitting users’ login details.

    “Because we have very few ways to actually validate the source of data on our phones, the address bar is pretty much the only bit of screen real estate that developers (angelic and devilish alike) are prohibited from monkeying with,” wrote Rapid7’s Tod Beardsley in a blog post.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022