Opera Mini hits iTunes, awaits Apple verdict

Mobile browsing's never been so interesting


Opera has finally submitted its browser to the iTunes store, daring Apple to reject it, while Firefox has called it a day for the Windows Mobile version of Fennec.

Opera has been publicly taunting Apple for a while now, showing off Opera Mini on an iPhone while it ironed out the bugs in an application that few believe Apple will allow to be sold. Similarly Microsoft's adoption of that same level of control has killed off the Windows Mobile version of Fennec - the mobile version of Firefox can't exist within the limitations on the forthcoming Windows Phone 7 Series.

Apple has resolutely refused to allow alternative browsers on the iPhone - arguing that offering multiple ways of doing the same thing just confuses users without adding value. Applications can enhance Apple's own webkit-based browser, but can't replace the underlying engine in the way that Opera Mini does.

That's a shame for those who'd like the faster browsing Opera Mini's server-based rendering enables, not to mention background tabs that actually load while they're in the background.

The Apple SDK agreement spells out that applications can't interpret code for themselves - so no Flash, Java, or similar. Opera argues that because their Mini browser relies on servers to do all the interpretation, the client is simply rendering streamed content and therefore falls within the rules. But those rules also state that Apple can reject anything it likes, without having to explain itself to tiresome Norwegians or anyone else.

It's an attitude that Microsoft wants to replicate with Windows Phone 7 Series, which is what has the Firefox chaps so depressed. Microsoft's new mobile platform won't allow native applications, which limits Fennec (as the mobile version of Firefox is known) to the existing Windows Mobile platform - which we all know is a dead man walking, despite Microsoft's assertions to the contrary.

Fennec will continue - there are still many mobile platforms which don't enforce such dictatorial regimes - but Apple has shown the commercial advantages of being the one in charge so it's only to be expected that many will follow its lead. ®


Keep Reading

Tech Resources

Apps are Essential, so your WAF must be effective

You can’t run a business today without applications—and because apps are critical to strategic business imperatives and commerce, they have become the prime target for attackers.

Webcast Slide Deck | How backup modernization changes the ransomware game

If the thrill of backing up your data and wondering if you will ever see it again has worn off, start the new year by getting rid of the lingering pain of legacy backup. Bipul Sinha, CEO of the Cloud Data Management Company, Rubrik, and Miguel Zatarain, Director of Global Infrastructure Technology at PACCAR, Fortune 500 manufacturer of trucks and Rubrik customer, are talking to the Reg’s Tim Phillips about how to eliminate the costly, slow and spotty performance of legacy backup, and how to modernize your implementation in 2021 to make your business more resilient.

Three reasons you need a hybrid multicloud

Businesses need their IT teams to operate applications and data in a hybrid environment spanning on-premises private and public clouds. But this poses many challenges, such as managing complex networking, re-architecting applications for the cloud, and managing multiple infrastructure silos. There is a pressing need for a single platform that addresses these challenges - a hybrid multicloud built for the digital innovation era. Just this Regcast to find out: Why hybrid multicloud is the ideal path to accelerate cloud migration.

Top 20 Private Cloud Questions Answered

Download this asset for straight answers to your top private cloud questions.

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021