Hackers pose as senator in email fraud bid

Stranded in bonnie Scotland


Update: This story originally said that hackers had attempted to scam a US Senator. The target was actually an Iowa state senator.

Fraudsters attempted to scam a state senator's contacts after breaking into his webmail account.

Contacts of Bob Dvorsky, an Iowa state senator, received a message from his Yahoo account claiming that the lawmaker was stranded in Scotland and in urgent need of financial help. The scam message claimed that Dvorsky needed £10,000 to pay hotel bills and, even more unlikely, was out of access by phone. The full text of the email can be seen in a blog post by Sophos here.

Marks were invited to wire over money which would be collected by the hackers who broke into Dvorsky's Yahoo! email account. The senator told local news channel KCRG TV News that his Yahoo account was compromised as the result of a phishing scam.

Dvorsky is far from the first politician to be publicly embarrassed by email security problems. Hackers mounted an almost identical scam after breaking into the webmail account of former UK cabinet minister Jack Straw. The fraudsters, posing as Straw, claimed he'd lost his wallet during a trip to Nigeria. Most famously, the Yahoo account of Republican politician Sarah Palin was hacked into as the result of poor password reminder choices during the US presidential elections two years ago. ®

Broader topics

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • Europol arrests nine suspected of stealing 'several million' euros via phishing
    Victims lured into handing over online banking logins, police say

    Europol cops have arrested nine suspected members of a cybercrime ring involved in phishing, internet scams, and money laundering.

    The alleged crooks are believed to have stolen "several million euros" from at least "dozens of Belgian victims," according to that nation's police, which, along with the Dutch, supported the cross-border operation.

    On Tuesday, after searching 24 houses in the Netherlands, officers cuffed eight men between the ages of 25 and 36 from Amsterdam, Almere, Rotterdam, and Spijkenisse, and a 25-year-old woman from Deventer. We're told the cops seized, among other things, a firearm, designer clothing, expensive watches, and tens of thousands of euros.

    Continue reading
  • Interpol anti-fraud operation busts call centers behind business email scams
    1,770 premises raided, 2,000 arrested, $50m seized

    Law enforcement agencies around the world have arrested about 2,000 people and seized $50 million in a sweeping operation crackdown of social engineering and other scam operations around the globe.

    In the latest action in the ongoing "First Light", an operation Interpol has coordinated annually since 2014, law enforcement officials from 76 countries raided 1,770 call centers suspected of running fraudulent operations such as telephone and romance scams, email deception scams, and financial crimes.

    Among the 2,000 people arrested in Operation First Light 2022 were call center operators and fraudsters, and money launderers. Interpol stated that the operation also saw 4,000 bank accounts frozen and 3,000 suspects identified.

    Continue reading
  • Microsoft seizes 41 domains tied to 'Iranian phishing ring'
    Windows giant gets court order to take over dot-coms and more

    Microsoft has obtained a court order to seize 41 domains used by what the Windows giant said was an Iranian cybercrime group that ran a spear-phishing operation targeting organizations in the US, Middle East, and India. 

    The Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit said the gang, dubbed Bohrium, took a particular interest in those working in technology, transportation, government, and education sectors: its members would pretend to be job recruiters to lure marks into running malware on their PCs.

    "Bohrium actors create fake social media profiles, often posing as recruiters," said Amy Hogan-Burney, GM of Microsoft's Digital Crimes Unit. "Once personal information was obtained from the victims, Bohrium sent malicious emails with links that ultimately infected their target's computers with malware."

    Continue reading
  • Voicemail phishing emails steal Microsoft credentials
    As always, check that O365 login page is actually O365

    Someone is trying to steal people's Microsoft 365 and Outlook credentials by sending them phishing emails disguised as voicemail notifications.

    This email campaign was detected in May and is ongoing, according to researchers at Zscaler's ThreatLabz, and is similar to phishing messages sent a couple of years ago.

    This latest wave is aimed at US entities in a broad array of sectors, including software security, security solution providers, the military, healthcare and pharmaceuticals, and the manufacturing and shipping supply chain, the researchers wrote this month.

    Continue reading
  • Facebook phishing campaign nets millions in IDs and cash
    Hundreds of millions of stolen credentials and a cool $59 million

    An ongoing phishing campaign targeting Facebook users may have already netted hundreds of millions of credentials and a claimed $59 million, and it's only getting bigger.

    Identified by security researchers at phishing prevention company Pixm in late 2021, the campaign has only been running since the final quarter of last year, but has already proven incredibly successful. Just one landing page - out of around 400 Pixm found - got 2.7 million visitors in 2021, and has already tricked 8.5 million viewers into visiting it in 2022. 

    The flow of this phishing campaign isn't unique: Like many others targeting users on social media, the attack comes as a link sent via DM from a compromised account. That link performs a series of redirects, often through malvertising pages to rack up views and clicks, ultimately landing on a fake Facebook login page. That page, in turn, takes the victim to advert landing pages that generate additional revenue for the campaign's organizers. 

    Continue reading
  • Zscaler bulks up AI, cloud, IoT in its zero-trust systems
    Focus emerges on workload security during its Zenith 2022 shindig

    Zscaler is growing the machine-learning capabilities of its zero-trust platform and expanding it into the public cloud and network edge, CEO Jay Chaudhry told devotees at a conference in Las Vegas today.

    Along with the AI advancements, Zscaler at its Zenith 2022 show in Sin City also announced greater integration of its technologies with Amazon Web Services, and a security management offering designed to enable infosec teams and developers to better detect risks in cloud-native applications.

    In addition, the biz also is putting a focus on the Internet of Things (IoT) and operational technology (OT) control systems as it addresses the security side of the network edge. Zscaler, for those not aware, makes products that securely connect devices, networks, and backend systems together, and provides the monitoring, controls, and cloud services an organization might need to manage all that.

    Continue reading
  • World Economic Forum wants a global map of online crime
    Will cyber crimes shrug off Atlas Initiative? Objectively, yes

    RSA Conference An ambitious project spearheaded by the World Economic Forum (WEF) is working to develop a map of the cybercrime ecosystem using open source information.

    The Atlas initiative, whose contributors include Fortinet and Microsoft and other private-sector firms, involves mapping the relationships between criminal groups and their infrastructure with the end goal of helping both industry and the public sector — law enforcement and government agencies — disrupt these nefarious ecosystems.  

    This kind of visibility into the connections between the gang members can help security researchers identify vulnerabilities in the criminals' supply chain to develop better mitigation strategies and security controls for their customers. 

    Continue reading
  • Heineken says there’s no free beer, warns of phishing scam
    WhatsApp messages possibly the worst Father's Day present in the world

    There's no such thing as free beer for Father's Day — at least not from Heineken. The brewing giant confirmed that a contest circulating on WhatsApp, which promises a chance to win one of 5,000 coolers full of green-bottled lager, is a frothy fraud.

    "This is a scam. Thank you for highlighting it to us. Please don't click on links or forward any messages. Many thanks," the beermaker said in a tweet.

    The phony WhatsApp giveaway includes an image of a cooler of 18 Heinekens and a link to a website purporting to run the giveaway. That page asks visitors vying to bag free booze for their personal information, such as names, email addresses, and phone numbers, which is all collected by miscreants.

    Continue reading
  • Google: How we tackled this iPhone, Android spyware
    Watching people's every move and collecting their info – not on our watch, says web ads giant

    Spyware developed by Italian firm RCS Labs was used to target cellphones in Italy and Kazakhstan — in some cases with an assist from the victims' cellular network providers, according to Google's Threat Analysis Group (TAG).

    RCS Labs customers include law-enforcement agencies worldwide, according to the vendor's website. It's one of more than 30 outfits Google researchers are tracking that sell exploits or surveillance capabilities to government-backed groups. And we're told this particular spyware runs on both iOS and Android phones.

    We understand this particular campaign of espionage involving RCS's spyware was documented last week by Lookout, which dubbed the toolkit "Hermit." We're told it is potentially capable of spying on the victims' chat apps, camera and microphone, contacts book and calendars, browser, and clipboard, and beam that info back to base. It's said that Italian authorities have used this tool in tackling corruption cases, and the Kazakh government has had its hands on it, too.

    Continue reading
  • NSO claims 'more than 5' EU states use Pegasus spyware
    And it's like, what ... 12, 13,000 total targets a year max, exec says

    NSO Group told European lawmakers this week that "under 50" customers use its notorious Pegasus spyware, though these customers include "more than five" European Union member states.

    The surveillance-ware maker's General Counsel Chaim Gelfand refused to answer specific questions about the company's customers during a European Parliament committee meeting on Thursday. 

    Instead, he frequently repeated the company line that NSO exclusively sells its spyware to government agencies — not private companies or individuals — and only "for the purpose of preventing and investigating terrorism and other serious crimes."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022