Extraterrestrials strafe Bosnian with meteorites

'I have no doubt I am being targeted by aliens'


A Bosnian man whose house has been hit six times by meteorites has come to the conclusion he's done something to hack off ET, the Telegraph reports.

Radivoje Lajic, 50, from the village of Gornji Lajici, near Prijedor in northern Bosnia, has suffered half a dozen strikes since November 2007. Spookily, the impacts always happen when it's raining, adding to Lajic's sense that he's at the receiving end of an unearthly strop.

He said: "I am obviously being targeted by extraterrestrials. I don't know what I have done to annoy them but there is no other explanation that makes sense. The chance of being hit by a meteorite is so small that getting hit six times has to be deliberate."

The shaken Bosnian added: "They are playing games with me. I don't know why they are doing this. When it rains I can't sleep for worrying about another strike."

Lajic has now reinforced his roof against alien attack with a steel girder - handily financed by selling one of the alien projectiles to a Dutch university. Boffins, meanwhile, are "studying magnetic fields around the property to try and explain the frequency of the strikes".

Agreeably, there's an upside to this sinister tale of space vendetta. Lajic explained: "But these meteorites have brought happiness to our family as well, as we've met different people from around the world that were interested in it. And I have had so many visitors that I plan to make a small museum in my back garden." ®


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