Fusion-io gets Dell in a flash

Round Rock shipping ioDrives


Start-up Fusion-io has snagged Dell as an OEM for its ioDrive PCIe flash card accelerators.

Dell, via Michael Dell, is an investor in Fusion-io, a Salt Lake City-based startup, and now joins HP and IBM as an OEM for its products. The ioDrive technology provides a slug of flash memory for use by servers which accelerates application performance by acting as a high-speed memory resource, slower than DRAM but much faster than hard drives.

The ioDrive is available currently as a160GB single-level cell (SLC) product and in 320GB and 620GB multi-level cell (MLC) variants utilising 2-bit MLC technology. MLC flash is generally regarded as too slow, too unreliable and too limited in its write endurance for enterprise use, so Fusion-io has countered these problems.

Fusion's chief technology officer, Neil Carson, says the company is "the first vendor in the industry to deliver MLC-based solutions to the enterprise".

The ioDrive technology offers up to 285,000 sustained IOPS with a less than 25 microsecond commit latency.

The ioDrive Duo is conceptually a couple of ioDrives on a single card and goes up to 1.28TB of capacity. Both products use ioMemory flash modules whose capacity has recently doubled by use of sub-40nm flash process technology.

Samsung, the leading flash fabrication supplier, has a 34nm process technology and recently invested in Fusion-io.

Dell is producing an M610x blade server with two, full-size generation 2 PCI Express slots, which makes it possible for it to house two ioDrive Duos, meaning a maximum flash capacity of 2.56TB. Such a server, fully populated with DRAM and flash, would have an awesome ability to handle application I/Os without needing to go to disk.

The Fusion-io release mentions "scaling virtual machine deployments, driving faster financial transactions, serving up web content and accelerating database and data mining performance".

David Flynn, Fusion-io's CEO and co-founder, said: “We look forward to working with Dell to provide its customers with an ultra-high density memory that’s accessed like storage.”

Dell can ship ioDrives immediately; the ioDrive Duos will ship in a few weeks' time. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Will Lenovo ever think beyond hardware?
    Then again, why develop your own software à la HPE GreenLake when you can use someone else's?

    Analysis Lenovo fancies its TruScale anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform as a more flexible competitor to HPE GreenLake or Dell Apex. Unlike its rivals, Lenovo doesn't believe it needs to mimic all aspects of the cloud to be successful.

    While subscription services are nothing new for Lenovo, the company only recently consolidated its offerings into a unified XaaS service called TruScale.

    On the surface TruScale ticks most of the XaaS boxes — cloud-like consumption model, subscription pricing — and it works just like you'd expect. Sign up for a certain amount of compute capacity and a short time later a rack full of pre-plumbed compute, storage, and network boxes are delivered to your place of choosing, whether that's a private datacenter, colo, or edge location.

    Continue reading
  • Dell unveils new XPS 13 devices with Alder Lake CPUs
    Best hedge against a slowing PC market? Take some design tips from Apple

    Dell has pulled the lid off the latest pair of laptops in its XPS 13 line, in the hopes the new designs, refreshed internals, and an unmistakably Apple-like aesthetic of its 2-in-1 approach can give them a boost in a sputtering PC market. 

    Both new machines are total redesigns, which is in line with Dell's plans to revamp its XPS series. Dell users considering an upgrade will want to take note, especially those interested in the XPS 13 2-in-1: There is quite a bit of difference, for both enterprise and consumer folks. 

    The XPS 13 maintains its form factor – for the most part – but gets a new smooth aluminum chassis that makes it look more like a MacBook Air than ever. Not that that's necessarily a bad thing: the new design is reportedly lighter and thinner, too. 

    Continue reading
  • PC shipments sink amid steady waves of supply chain, war disruptions
    320 million units forecast, still well above pre-pandemic, but boom is over for now

    Orders for PCs are forecast to shrink in 2022 as consumers confront rising inflation, the war in Ukraine, and lockdowns in parts of the world critical to the supply chain, all of which continue.

    So says IDC, which forecast shipments to decline 8.2 percent year-on-year to 321.2 million units during this calendar year. This follows three straight years of growth, the last of which saw units shipped rise to 348.8 million.

    Things might be taking a turn for the worse but they are far from disastrous for an industry revived by the pandemic when PCs became the center of many people's universe. Shipments are still forecast to come in well above the pre-pandemic norms; 267 million units were shipped in 2019.

    Continue reading
  • Broadcom in talks to buy VMware: multiple reports
    Michael Dell could be the key to any deal

    Broadcom is in early talks to buy VMware, according to The New York Times, Bloomberg, and Reuters.

    VMware is not commenting on the matter.

    This one is interesting, because the three sources we've linked to above all say they've got the news from "a person familiar with the matter." All say the deal is nowhere near done, a price has not been discussed, and a transaction is far from certain to happen.

    Continue reading
  • (Our) hardware is still key in a multicloud world, Dell ISG chief insists
    IT giant may be shifting its focus to software and services, but systems remain the foundation

    Analysis At this month's Dell Technologies World show in Las Vegas, all the usual executives were prowling the keynote stages, from CEO Michael Dell to co-COOs Chuck Witten and Jeff Clark, all talking about the future of the company.

    Noticeably absent were the big servers or storage systems that for decades had joined them on stage, complete with all the speeds and feeds. Though a PC made an appearance, there was no reveal of big datacenter boxes.

    It's a continuing scenario that is likely to play out to various degrees at user events for other established IT hardware vendors, such as when Hewlett Packard Enterprise later next month convenes its Discover show, also in Las Vegas. It's having to adapt to the steady upward trend in multicloud adoption, the ongoing decentralization of IT and the understanding that in today's world, data is king, Hardware is still needed, but the outcomes they deliver are what is most important.

    Continue reading
  • Zero trust is more than just vendors and products – it requires process
    IT orgs need to adapt their procedures to make it all work, says Dell

    Dell Technologies World Zero-trust architectures have become a focus for enterprises trying to figure out how to secure an IT environment where data and applications are increasingly distributed outside of the traditional perimeter defenses of central datacenters.

    With the attack surface expanding and cyberthreats growing in number and complexity, many organizations are sorting through a cybersecurity space that has myriad vendors and products to choose from, according to Chad Dunn, vice president for product management for Dell's Apex as-a-service business.

    Zero trust – which essentially dictates that any person or device trying to access the network should not be trusted and needs to go through a strict authentication and verification process – will be foundational for companies moving forward, but it has to be more than simply buying and deploying products, Dunn told The Register in an interview here in Las Vegas at the Dell Technologies World show.

    Continue reading
  • Dell brings data recovery tools to Apex and the cloud
    Dell shows off full stack of cyber recovery SaaS, partners with Snowflake for data analytics

    LAS VEGAS – Dell is giving enterprises new ways to protect the data they store in public clouds.

    At the Dell Technologies World event Monday, the company unveiled a full-stack cyber-recovery managed services offering in its Apex -as-a-service portfolio and data protection technologies that will be available in both the Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure public clouds.

    In addition, Dell is partnering with high-profile cloud-based data analytics vendor Snowflake to enable organizations to take the data they're keeping in their data centers in Dell object storage and run it in Snowflake's Data Cloud while keeping the data on premises or copying it to the public cloud, an important capability for companies with data sovereignty or privacy concerns who can't freely move it around.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022