Epson parades tea cup-sized flying robot

Buzz over tiny whirlybird


Epson has developed a flying-robot that is the size of a teacup, but which is controlled remotely by Bluetooth for the duration of its three-minute flights.

epson_flying_robot The FR-II micro flying-robot is the latest in a long line of Seiko Epson's flying micro-robots. The craft can take off, vary its altitude, follow flight path instructions and hover. It also has an image sensor unit, which allows it to transmit images back to the controller on land.

On board is a 32-bit microcontroller, a motor, a digital camera that sends low-quality images and a tiny gyro-sensor. The robot is 13.6cm tall and 8.5cm in width. It weighs around 12.3 grams and can fly for approximately three minutes.

Its creators say it could be used in rescue operations within two years, to beam back pictures of dangerous places.

The craft will be displayed at the Emerging Technology Fair in Tokyo at the end of the month, where its features will be demonstrated in "artistic aerial performances."

Epson has a proud history in flying robots, which it develops using what it calls its "micromechatronics" technologies. Its first flying robot was Monsieur, listed as the world's smallest micro-robot in the Guinness Book of Records in 1993. Since then the company has developed and sold a number of flying robots in its EMRoS series.

The range of the FR prototype was limited by the length of the power cord attaching it to an external battery, and although it was radio-controlled, it had to be kept within sight of the operator while flying. With FR II, the flying range has been extended by developing fully wireless operation paired with independent flight capability.

Epson was assisted in FR II's development by Chiba University's Nonami Laboratory in developing the control system for independent flight. The company also received advice on the rotor design from the Kawachi Laboratory at the University of Tokyo.

© ENN

Related stories

Japanese boffins build Dalek-style robot guards
DARPA figures out how to run a $2m robot race
Captain Cyborg to risk all for science
Killer cyberappliances: Satan implicated


Other stories you might like

  • Warehouse belonging to Chinese payment terminal manufacturer raided by FBI

    PAX Technology devices allegedly infected with malware

    US feds were spotted raiding a warehouse belonging to Chinese payment terminal manufacturer PAX Technology in Jacksonville, Florida, on Tuesday, with speculation abounding that the machines contained preinstalled malware.

    PAX Technology is headquartered in Shenzhen, China, and is one of the largest electronic payment providers in the world. It operates around 60 million point-of-sale (PoS) payment terminals in more than 120 countries.

    Local Jacksonville news anchor Courtney Cole tweeted photos of the scene.

    Continue reading
  • Everything you wanted to know about modern network congestion control but were perhaps too afraid to ask

    In which a little unfairness can be quite beneficial

    Systems Approach It’s hard not to be amazed by the amount of active research on congestion control over the past 30-plus years. From theory to practice, and with more than its fair share of flame wars, the question of how to manage congestion in the network is a technical challenge that resists an optimal solution while offering countless options for incremental improvement.

    This seems like a good time to take stock of where we are, and ask ourselves what might happen next.

    Congestion control is fundamentally an issue of resource allocation — trying to meet the competing demands that applications have for resources (in a network, these are primarily link bandwidth and router buffers), which ultimately reduces to deciding when to say no and to whom. The best framing of the problem I know traces back to a paper [PDF] by Frank Kelly in 1997, when he characterized congestion control as “a distributed algorithm to share network resources among competing sources, where the goal is to choose source rate so as to maximize aggregate source utility subject to capacity constraints.”

    Continue reading
  • How business makes streaming faster and cheaper with CDN and HESP support

    Ensure a high video streaming transmission rate

    Paid Post Here is everything about how the HESP integration helps CDN and the streaming platform by G-Core Labs ensure a high video streaming transmission rate for e-sports and gaming, efficient scalability for e-learning and telemedicine and high quality and minimum latencies for online streams, media and TV broadcasters.

    HESP (High Efficiency Stream Protocol) is a brand new adaptive video streaming protocol. It allows delivery of content with latencies of up to 2 seconds without compromising video quality and broadcasting stability. Unlike comparable solutions, this protocol requires less bandwidth for streaming, which allows businesses to save a lot of money on delivery of content to a large audience.

    Since HESP is based on HTTP, it is suitable for video transmission over CDNs. G-Core Labs was among the world’s first companies to have embedded this protocol in its CDN. With 120 points of presence across 5 continents and over 6,000 peer-to-peer partners, this allows a service provider to deliver videos to millions of viewers, to any devices, anywhere in the world without compromising even 8K video quality. And all this comes at a minimum streaming cost.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021