Symantec and Snoop Dogg launch cybercrime rap contest

Now thass geekster


Symantec has teamed up with rapper Snoop Dogg to launch a cybercrime rap contest.

Participants are invited to bust some rhymes on the subject of malware, hacking and botnets for the chance to win an all expenses paid trip to LA to attend a Snoop gig and meet his people, if not the rapper himself. Winners get a Toshiba laptop outfitted (inevitably) with Norton Internet Security 2011. Entry is only open to US residents.

Would-be rappers are invited to submit a two-minute rap video to www.HackIsWack.com before the 30 September deadline. The winner will be selected on the basis of "originality, creativity and message".

In the meantime the contest is being promoted via Facebook and a dedicated Twitter feed already offering nuggets of wisdom such as "dk man, iz it this spiff or iz @RealWizKhalifa from rollin 20's snoop hood lmmfao. #blackandYellow #dj #bbm".

The exercise has the laudable aim of raising awareness about cybercrime but we can't help fearing the musical results are likely to be dire. When corporate giants team with musical stars to appear "down with the kids" the results are seldom edifying.

Unfortunately early entries to the HackIsWack contest, which launched on Moday, fully vindicate these fears. ®

Broader topics

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • World Economic Forum wants a global map of online crime
    Will cyber crimes shrug off Atlas Initiative? Objectively, yes

    RSA Conference An ambitious project spearheaded by the World Economic Forum (WEF) is working to develop a map of the cybercrime ecosystem using open source information.

    The Atlas initiative, whose contributors include Fortinet and Microsoft and other private-sector firms, involves mapping the relationships between criminal groups and their infrastructure with the end goal of helping both industry and the public sector — law enforcement and government agencies — disrupt these nefarious ecosystems.  

    This kind of visibility into the connections between the gang members can help security researchers identify vulnerabilities in the criminals' supply chain to develop better mitigation strategies and security controls for their customers. 

    Continue reading
  • Symantec: More malware operators moving in to exploit Follina
    Meanwhile Microsoft still hasn't patched the fatal flaw

    While enterprises are still waiting for Microsoft to issue a fix for the critical "Follina" vulnerability in Windows, yet more malware operators are moving in to exploit it.

    Microsoft late last month acknowledged the remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability – tracked as CVE-2022-30190 – but has yet to deliver a patch for it. The company has outlined workarounds that can be used until a fix becomes available.

    In the meantime, reports of active exploits of the flaw continue to surface. Analysts with Proofpoint's Threat Insight team earlier this month tweeted about a phishing campaign, possibly aligned with a nation-state targeting US and European Union agencies, which uses Follina. The Proofpoint researchers said the malicious spam messages were sent to fewer than 10 Proofpoint product users.

    Continue reading
  • Clipminer rakes in $1.7m in crypto hijacking scam
    Crooks divert transactions to own wallets while running mining on the side

    A crew using malware that performs cryptomining and clipboard-hacking operations have made off with at least $1.7 million in stolen cryptocurrency.

    The malware, dubbed Trojan.Clipminer, leverages the compute power of compromised systems to mine for cryptocurrency as well as identify crypto-wallet addresses in clipboard text and replace it to redirect transactions, according to researchers with Symantec's Threat Intelligence Team.

    The first samples of the Windows malware appeared in January 2021 and began to accelerate in their spread the following month, the Symantec researchers wrote in a blog post this week. They also observed that there are several design similarities between Clipminer and KryptoCibule – another cryptomining trojan that, a few months before Clipminer hit the scene, was detected and written about by ESET analysts.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022