US navy to battle Iranian mini-ekranoplan swarms with rayguns

Laser energy cannon vs 'stealth' WIG-ships


The US military-industrial complex has unveiled its answer to the much-vaunted "swarm" tactics of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard naval forces, which might see squadrons of "stealth" flying boats and attack craft overwhelming the defences of US warships in the Persian Gulf. The US Navy will deal with this, apparently, using rapid-firing laser raygun cannons to sweep their swarming enemies from the seas and skies around them.

American weaponry megacorp Northrop Grumman says that shorebased testing of its Maritime Laser Demonstration (MLD) blaster cannon have been successful, and the firm is confident that seagoing trials later this year will be a triumph. The high-power lasers used in the MLD are the same units developed under the earlier Joint High Power Solid State Laser programme, which were the first solid-state, electrically powered kit* to deliver a combat-strength 100 kilowatt war ray.

"Unlike commercial lasers that form the core of some laser systems intended for use at sea," sneers Northrop raygun honcho Dan Wildt, "MLD's power levels can be scaled to 100 kilowatts and beyond."

In a statement just released, the company goes on to add:

Northrop Grumman is developing MLD for the Office of Naval Research with a goal of demonstrating the readiness of solid-state laser weapon systems to begin transition to the fleet to engage targets that challenge current defensive systems such as swarms of enemy fast patrol boats.

"Swarm" tactics have been much discussed in Western naval circles in recent years, with particular reference to operations in the Persian Gulf against Iranian forces. The regular Iranian navy is not thought to offer much of a threat to powerful Western warships, and Iran is unlikely to procure a powerful new fleet along conventional lines.

But the Iranian Revolutionary Guard, which has air and naval units as well as land ones, would like to be able to choke off the Gulf - and with it the flow of oil - nonetheless. In recent times, the Guard - known as the Pasdaran in Iran - has acquired large fleets of small, fast attack boats and other craft intended to swarm US naval task groups and saturate their defences. Surviving Parsdaran crews, once they reached close range, would then be able to cripple billion-dollar US warships designed for Cold War combat against the Soviet Navy, and so ultimately seize control of the Gulf.

Pasdaran commanders generally announce new purchases of these craft or exercises involving them with a good deal of bombast, as in the recent description of some new Bavar reconnaissance seaplanes - more than somewhat primitive in construction - as "stealth flying boats" (see the vid above).

In fairness to the Iranians, the "stealth" referred to here doesn't mean any serious design effort to make the craft absorb radar transmissions or reflect them away from the scanner, as a Western stealth aircraft does. Rather, the Bavar appears optimised for low flying very close to the sea surface, probably within ground effect much of the time (like the famous Soviet "ekranoplan" wing-in-ground effect - WIG - cruisers of yesteryear).

A Bavar zooming along almost in the water would be more difficult to pick out of the sea clutter for a US naval radar operator: though not really any more difficult than a regular speedboat, especially in the calm conditions it would require to fly so low. And a Bavar would tend to be detected by high-flying US radar aircraft long before it could get close enough to see/detect any US ships itself.

Whether swarm tactics would actually work remains open to debate. Some US wargames have indicated that they could be very effective: other studies suggest that the swarming waves of Pasdaran speedboats, WIGships etc would simply be slaughtered without any major effect on US and allied navies seeking to keep the Straits of Hormuz open and the oil flowing out to the West.

In any case, it all makes a good enough hook for Northrop to hang its new electro-laser technology on. One issue with swarm tactics is that US warships and aircraft might simply run out of missiles and gun ammunition before Iran ran out of attackers: but electric ray-cannons developed from the MLD, powered by the carrying vessel's generators, could potentially keep on blasting as long as the ship had fuel left.

According to Northrop, the MLD "burned through small boat sections" in tests conducted last month at the Potomac River Test Range, indicating that its performance over water is up to the job.

"This successful test series gives us confidence that we will be successful at the at sea demonstrator scheduled later this year," says Northrop bigwig Steve Hixson. ®

Bootnote

*Existing weapons such as the jumbo-jet-mounted Airborne Laser Testbed use chemically-fuelled gas lasers, which can develop much more power - in the range of several megawatts, reportedly - but are hugely cumbersome and can fire only a limited number of "shots" before requiring a complicated topping up with hazardous fuels.


Other stories you might like

  • Twitter founder Dorsey beats hasty retweet from the board
    As shareholders sue the social network amid Elon Musk's takeover scramble

    Twitter has officially entered the post-Dorsey age: its founder and two-time CEO's board term expired Wednesday, marking the first time the social media company hasn't had him around in some capacity.

    Jack Dorsey announced his resignation as Twitter chief exec in November 2021, and passed the baton to Parag Agrawal while remaining on the board. Now that board term has ended, and Dorsey has stepped down as expected. Agrawal has taken Dorsey's board seat; Salesforce co-CEO Bret Taylor has assumed the role of Twitter's board chair. 

    In his resignation announcement, Dorsey – who co-founded and is CEO of Block (formerly Square) – said having founders leading the companies they created can be severely limiting for an organization and can serve as a single point of failure. "I believe it's critical a company can stand on its own, free of its founder's influence or direction," Dorsey said. He didn't respond to a request for further comment today. 

    Continue reading
  • Snowflake stock drops as some top customers cut usage
    You might say its valuation is melting away

    IPO darling Snowflake's share price took a beating in an already bearish market for tech stocks after filing weaker than expected financial guidance amid a slowdown in orders from some of its largest customers.

    For its first quarter of fiscal 2023, ended April 30, Snowflake's revenue grew 85 percent year-on-year to $422.4 million. The company made an operating loss of $188.8 million, albeit down from $205.6 million a year ago.

    Although surpassing revenue expectations, the cloud-based data warehousing business saw its valuation tumble 16 percent in extended trading on Wednesday. Its stock price dived from $133 apiece to $117 in after-hours trading, and today is cruising back at $127. That stumble arrived amid a general tech stock sell-off some observers said was overdue.

    Continue reading
  • Amazon investors nuke proposed ethics overhaul and say yes to $212m CEO pay
    Workplace safety, labor organizing, sustainability and, um, wage 'fairness' all struck down in vote

    Amazon CEO Andy Jassy's first shareholder meeting was a rousing success for Amazon leadership and Jassy's bank account. But for activist investors intent on making Amazon more open and transparent, it was nothing short of a disaster.

    While actual voting results haven't been released yet, Amazon general counsel David Zapolsky told Reuters that stock owners voted down fifteen shareholder resolutions addressing topics including workplace safety, labor organizing, sustainability, and pay fairness. Amazon's board recommended voting no on all of the proposals.

    Jassy and the board scored additional victories in the form of shareholder approval for board appointments, executive compensation and a 20-for-1 stock split. Jassy's executive compensation package, which is tied to Amazon stock price and mostly delivered as stock awards over a multi-year period, was $212 million in 2021. 

    Continue reading
  • Confirmed: Broadcom, VMware agree to $61b merger
    Unless anyone out there can make a better offer. Oh, Elon?

    Broadcom has confirmed it intends to acquire VMware in a deal that looks set to be worth $61 billion, if it goes ahead: the agreement provides for a “go-shop” provision under which the virtualization giant may solicit alternative offers.

    Rumors of the proposed merger emerged earlier this week, amid much speculation, but neither of the companies was prepared to comment on the deal before today, when it was disclosed that the boards of directors of both organizations have unanimously approved the agreement.

    Michael Dell and Silver Lake investors, which own just over half of the outstanding shares in VMware between both, have apparently signed support agreements to vote in favor of the transaction, so long as the VMware board continues to recommend the proposed transaction with chip designer Broadcom.

    Continue reading
  • Perl Steering Council lays out a backwards compatible future for Perl 7
    Sensibly written code only, please. Plus: what all those 'heated discussions' were about

    The much-anticipated Perl 7 continues to twinkle in the distance although the final release of 5.36.0 is "just around the corner", according to the Perl Steering Council.

    Well into its fourth decade, the fortunes of Perl have ebbed and flowed over the years. Things came to a head last year, with the departure of former "pumpking" Sawyer X, following what he described as community "hostility."

    Part of the issue stemmed from the planned version 7 release, a key element of which, according to a post by the steering council "was to significantly reduce the boilerplate needed at the top of your code, by enabling a lot of widely used modules / pragmas."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022