Gov rolls out 'dedicated area of the internet' for digi-ware tests

Do say: Innovationation! Don't say: Double-dip recession


The government quango in charge of techbiz development, the Technology Strategy Board, has unveiled new schemes today aimed at greasing the progress of Blighty's general knowledge-wealthiness. In particular, the TSB has brought out a sort of digital playground in which companies can try out new netty stuff with government-provided beta testers.

The TSB digital test thing has been dubbed "IC Tomorrow" and is described as "a unique online resource that allows businesses to test new digital services and run trials with consumers in a dedicated area of the internet". The government tech-fertiliser bureau goes on to add:

Developed by the Technology Strategy Board, IC tomorrow enables content owners and application developers – any business with a new service, new business model or new way of deploying hardware or software technology – to trial their ideas with participating UK consumers, giving them the opportunity to provide feedback and shape products before they go on sale.

The TSB is also overjoyed to announce a range of other initiatives today, including a selection of tech prize competitions worth "up to about £50 million" for new developments in such areas as "marine energy, low carbon vehicles, regenerative medicine and the creative industries".

Similarly, the TSB and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council will ally to fund two new "Innovation and Knowledge Centres", which will "mix business knowledge with the most up-to-date research to harness the full potential of emerging technologies".

“A proven way to find new ideas and develop the products and services of tomorrow is to connect, collaborate and work together," says Dr Graham Spittle, TSB chairman, in a statement issued today.

So there's no need to worry about any nasty double-dip recession or anything: the government have it in hand. ®


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