Anonymous turns attack drones against fax machines

From cyberspace to Office Space


Pro-Wikileaks hacktivists have begun targeting the fax machines rather than the websites of firms who have withdrawn services from Wikileaks.

As part of the new Leakflood mission, activists have been encouraged to send faxes to Amazon, MasterCard, Moneybookers, PayPal, Visa and Tableau Software. The group published a list of fax numbers, encouraging members to send over extracts from leaked cables, letters from or images of Guy Fawkes – but no gross-out porn or similar offensive material. Would-be participants were encouraged to use the MyFax free fax service and to take steps to preserve their anonymity.

The campaign, which started at 13:00 GMT on Monday, is due to run for a day until 16:00 GMT on Tuesday. However, Netcraft reports that patriot hackers opposed to the operation have launched a counterstrike against the IRC servers where would-be participants go to discuss attack strategies. The anonops.eu domain (used to list the locations of IRC servers) has also come under attack and is currently unavailable.

Fax-flooding campaigns were also used against the Church of Scientology in the early phases of the Anonymous campaign against that organisation. It never emerged whether the tactic had been successful or not and it is still less unclear whether the fax-bombing of Amazon et al has caused any disruption. ®

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