Hacker charged over siphoning off funds meant for software devs

Accused of diverting Mystic River of cash


An alleged hacker has been charged with breaking into the e-commerce systems of Digital River before redirecting more than $250,000 to an account under his control.

Jeremey Parker of Houston, Texas, 35, is charged with fraudulently obtaining more than $274K between December 2008 and October 2009 following an alleged hack against the network of SWReg Inc, a Digital River subsidiary. SWReg specialises in running e-commerce fulfillment systems for smaller software developers who don't want the hassle of developing and maintaining their own online store. An indictment in the case, filed in a federal court in Minnesota, was unsealed on Tuesday.

A separate computer intrusion earlier this year obliged Digital River to obtain a court order against an individual who was allegedly planning to sell 200,000 records from a stolen database, net security firm Sophos notes. ®

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