Assange vows to drop 'insurance' files on Rupert Murdoch

News Corp and Bank of America too


WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says he has a trove of private documents on Rupert Murdoch and his News Corp empire and is prepared to release them in the event the whistle-blower website is taken down.

“If something happens to me or to WikiLeaks, 'insurance' files will be released,” he told The New Statesman. “There are 504 US embassy cables on one broadcasting organisation and there are cables on Murdoch and News Corp.”

The comments came a day after Assange told journalists in the UK that WikiLeaks planned to step up the publication of confidential US diplomatic cables following a lull in late December. The site will also move ahead with plans to publish tens of thousands of confidential documents depicting an “ecosystem of corruption” at Bank of America, CNBC reported.

Assange said WikiLeaks is mirrored on more than 2,000 websites.

Meanwhile, WikiLeaks supporter Jacob Appelbaum said in a series of tweets he was detained for about 30 minutes by US customs officials earlier this week upon his return from Iceland.

“I was detained, searched, and CPB did attempt to question me about the nature of my vacation upon landing in Seattle,” he wrote in one dispatch, in an apparent reference to the US Customs and Border Protection. “The CPB specifically wanted laptops and cell phones and were visibly unhappy when they discovered nothing of the sort. I did however have a few USB thumb drives with a copy of the Bill of Rights encoded into the block device. They were unable to copy it.” ®


Other stories you might like

  • China reveals its top five sources of online fraud
    'Brushing' tops the list, as quantity of forbidden content continue to rise

    China’s Ministry of Public Security has revealed the five most prevalent types of fraud perpetrated online or by phone.

    The e-commerce scam known as “brushing” topped the list and accounted for around a third of all internet fraud activity in China. Brushing sees victims lured into making payment for goods that may not be delivered, or are only delivered after buyers are asked to perform several other online tasks that may include downloading dodgy apps and/or establishing e-commerce profiles. Victims can find themselves being asked to pay more than the original price for goods, or denied promised rebates.

    Brushing has also seen e-commerce providers send victims small items they never ordered, using profiles victims did not create or control. Dodgy vendors use that tactic to then write themselves glowing product reviews that increase their visibility on marketplace platforms.

    Continue reading
  • Sina Weibo, China's Twitter analog, reveals users' locations and IP addresses
    Sssshhhh! Nobody tell Elon Musk

    To the surprise of many users, China's largest Twitter-esque microblogging website, Sina Weibo, announced on Thursday that it will publish users' IP addresses and location data in an effort to keep their content honest and nice.

    In a post whose title translates as "IP Territorial Function Upgrade Announcement," the company stated it was taking the action to protect users' rights, and to make the service more pleasant to use.

    "In order to reduce undesirable behaviors such as impersonating parties, malicious rumors … as well as to ensure the authenticity and transparency of the disseminated content, the site launched the 'IP Territory' function in March this year," announced the social media platform's official account in Chinese.

    Continue reading
  • UK Supreme Court snubs Assange anti-extradition bid
    Home Secretary ponders putting WikiLeaker on one-way US flight

    Julian Assange has all but lost his fight against extradition from Britain to America after the UK Supreme Court said his case "did not raise an arguable point of law."

    The former WikiLeaks chief's future now rests in the tender hands of British Home Secretary Priti Patel, who must formally decide whether or not to extradite him for trial in the US.

    American prosecutors want the Australian in court over a multitude of espionage charges, including one alleging that he commissioned the cracking of a password protecting US Department of Defense files from unauthorized access.

    Continue reading
  • Assange can go to UK Supreme Court (again) to fend off US extradition bid
    Top Brit judges may consider whether an American prison is just too much

    Julian Assange has won a technical victory in his ongoing battle against extradition from the UK to the United States, buying him a few more months in the relative safety of Her Majesty's Prison Belmarsh.

    Today at London's High Court, the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales Lord Burnett approved a question on a technical point of law, having refused Assange immediate permission to appeal to the UK Supreme Court. The WikiLeaker's lawyers had asked for formal permission to pose this legal conundrum about Assange's likely treatment in US prisons to the Supreme Court:

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022