PlayStation hacker defiantly posts 'bible' following police raid

'Cannot live without programming, HV, and Linux kernel hacking'


A German PlayStation 3 hacker has escalated his battle with Sony almost a week after the maker of the popular game console sued him for copyright infringement and had police seize his computer gear during a raid on his home.

Statements made online on Monday by Alexander Egorenkov, who goes by the hacking moniker graf_chokolo, are the latest salvo in a battle that started after his apartment was searched and computer files related to PS3 hacking were seized. Egorenkov responded by publishing what he called an “HV Bible” that makes use of hypervisor technology to allow PS3 owners to hack their game consoles. Even after Sony countered with demands that result in the bible being removed, the hacker has defiantly vowed to fight on.

“They still do not get how my mind works,” graf_chokolo wrote in comments to his website. “They want to make an example of me, to show the other hackers what ill happen to you if they mess with SONY, but they chose the wrong person. I'm not a spineless sheep they thought me to be. Take care SONY, because i could make an example of you.”

The website hosting the comments, grafchokolo.com, was no longer responding to requests at time of writing, but the comments are temporarily cached here.

Other websites reported that graf_chokolo's comments went even further.

“So, SONY you failed again, you took my equipment but my mind is still free and you canot [sic] control it,” he wrote, according to CrunchGear. “If you want me to stop then you should just kill me because i cannot live without programming, HV and Linux kernel hacking. You know who am i and where i live, so come and get me!!!”

At least one supporter claimed to have backup copies of the databases compiled by graf_chokolo.

“Just say the word,” someone with the username Mizukage wrote. “I will have hundreds of mirrors and torrent links up in matter of minutes. I also believe in freedom, and expecially [sic] in our legally own electronics (consoles also).”

The comments came after attorneys representing Sony sent take-down demands to websites hosting “coolstuff.rar,” uploaded by graf_chokolo following the raid.

“The file consists of copies, decrypted copies and reverse-engineered information of files belonging to the confidential core firmware used in the PlayStation3 which is distributed by our client,” Peter Ruess, a Dusseldorf attorney wrote in the letter.

Ruess, who confirmed the authenticity of the letter to The Register, went on to say Sony “obtained an ex parte injunction by the competent Hamburg District Court (Docket no. 310 O 24/11) relating to content in these files. The amount in controversy has been set at €1,000,000. As per the court order, Mr. Egorenkov's apartment has been searched and the police have seized his equipment into custody. By uploading the file in question, Mr. Egorenkov willingly ignored a judge's order.”

Sony's campaign to keep the files off the internet comes as attorneys in the US have engaged in a similarly messy battle against George Hotz, a well known jailbreaker who goes by the name GeoHot. In January, the company obtained an order requiring him to surrender his computer gear and more recently has sought subpoenas that target other customers who jailbreak their PS3s. The actions came as an official Sony Twitter account published the secret encryption key at the heart of the copyright case. ®

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