Cisco eats newScale for cloud control

Chambers to help those who help themselves


Cisco Systems wants to run your cloud, but you will end up doing most of the work thanks to its acquisition today of newScale.

newScale is not a startup, unless you count companies that were started back at the tail end of the dot-com boom in 1999, but in some ways it still behaves like one because the service catalog application software that founder Rodrigo Fernando Flores created more than a decade ago has come into vogue because of server virtualization and cloud computing.

In fact, one of the key technologies that turns raw infrastructure into a cloud is a self-service catalog that can keep infrastructure deployments consistent across many users but at the same time get end users off the backs of system administrators who need to manage an ever-increasing number and type of physical and logical devices.

newScale is privately held, and has had five rounds of funding, with $28.2m coming from its last three rounds according to its CrunchBase profile. Chess Ventures, Crosslink Capital, Menlo Ventures, Montagu Newhall Associates, New Enterprise Associates, Parker Price Venture Capital, and Wasatch Cross Creek Capital have all kicked in dough for the privately held company.

The newScale 9 suite of service delivery tools, which take all manner of IT hardware and software and turn it into a product catalog where people can order stuff like they do on Amazon or iTunes, was announced in January this year. The core component in the suite - and one with over two million users - is called newScale RequestCenter, and it implements a catalog for services performed by internal IT departments. PortfolioCenter is the catalog itself, and LifecycleCenter is the change management system for IT gear and services that controls how they are built, provisioned, and retired.

newScale has positioned its service catalog tools to be a key ingredient of cloudy infrastructure management, and said in January that in 2010, it grew its cloud customer base by 133 per cent and its deployments by 162 per cent. Scott Hammond, newScale's chief executive officer, said in a statement back then that in the fourth quarter of 2010, cloud-related software license sales were up 312 per cent.

This is the kind of growth that is attractive to Cisco. But rather than acquiring newScale to add it to its "California" Unified Computing System blade and switch amalgam, Cisco plans to plunk newScale into its Advanced Services group, where presumably Cisco can position the tool as being as neutral as Switzerland.

Financial terms of the acquisition were not disclosed. Cisco expects that the deal will close sometime in the second half of its fiscal 2011 year, which ends in July. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • VMware claims ‘bare-metal’ performance from virtualized Nvidia GPUs
    Is... is that why Broadcom wants to buy it?

    The future of high-performance computing will be virtualized, VMware's Uday Kurkure has told The Register.

    Kurkure, the lead engineer for VMware's performance engineering team, has spent the past five years working on ways to virtualize machine-learning workloads running on accelerators. Earlier this month his team reported "near or better than bare-metal performance" for Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers (BERT) and Mask R-CNN — two popular machine-learning workloads — running on virtualized GPUs (vGPU) connected using Nvidia's NVLink interconnect.

    NVLink enables compute and memory resources to be shared across up to four GPUs over a high-bandwidth mesh fabric operating at 6.25GB/s per lane compared to PCIe 4.0's 2.5GB/s. The interconnect enabled Kurkure's team to pool 160GB of GPU memory from the Dell PowerEdge system's four 40GB Nvidia A100 SXM GPUs.

    Continue reading
  • Nvidia promises annual datacenter product updates across CPU, GPU, and DPU
    Arm one year, x86 the next, and always faster than a certain chip shop that still can't ship even one standalone GPU

    Computex Nvidia's push deeper into enterprise computing will see its practice of introducing a new GPU architecture every two years brought to its CPUs and data processing units (DPUs, aka SmartNICs).

    Speaking on the company's pre-recorded keynote released to coincide with the Computex exhibition in Taiwan this week, senior vice president for hardware engineering Brian Kelleher spoke of the company's "reputation for unmatched execution on silicon." That's language that needs to be considered in the context of Intel, an Nvidia rival, again delaying a planned entry to the discrete GPU market.

    "We will extend our execution excellence and give each of our chip architectures a two-year rhythm," Kelleher added.

    Continue reading
  • Now Amazon puts 'creepy' AI cameras in UK delivery vans
    Big Bezos is watching you

    Amazon is reportedly installing AI-powered cameras in delivery vans to keep tabs on its drivers in the UK.

    The technology was first deployed, with numerous errors that reportedly denied drivers' bonuses after malfunctions, in the US. Last year, the internet giant produced a corporate video detailing how the cameras monitor drivers' driving behavior for safety reasons. The same system is now apparently being rolled out to vehicles in the UK. 

    Multiple camera lenses are placed under the front mirror. One is directed at the person behind the wheel, one is facing the road, and two are located on either side to provide a wider view. The cameras are monitored by software built by Netradyne, a computer-vision startup focused on driver safety. This code uses machine-learning algorithms to figure out what's going on in and around the vehicle.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022