Anonymous hacks Sony PS3 sites

Remove your penis from this hornets' nest


Several Sony PlayStation sites are unavailable this morning thanks to what looks like a distributed denial of service attack launched by Anonymous.

The hacktivists have left the Scientologists alone in order to harass the console-makers because of Sony's action against two lads for jailbreaking PS3s.

In a strangely self-important and sanctimonious message, the hackers said:

Congratulations, Sony.

You have now received the undivided attention of Anonymous. Your recent legal action against our fellow hackers, GeoHot and Graf_Chokolo, has not alarmed us, it has been deemed wholly unforgivable....

Now you will experience the wrath of Anonymous.

You saw a hornets' nest, and stuck your penises in it.

You must face the consequences of your actions.

Anonymous style."

No comment from Sony so far this morning, we will update this story should we hear back from them.

The UK PlayStation 3 site is down, so is the European PlayStation store. But the main US and UK Sony sites are still available.

There's more from AnonNews here.

Anonymous is better known for its attacks against Scientology and in support of Julian Assange. ®

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • Cloudflare says it thwarted record-breaking HTTPS DDoS flood
    26m requests a second? Not legit traffic, not even Bill Gates doing $1m giveaways could manage that

    Cloudflare said it this month staved off another record-breaking HTTPS-based distributed denial-of-service attack, this one significantly larger than the previous largest DDoS attack that occurred only two months ago.

    In April, the biz said it mitigated an HTTPS DDoS attack that reached a peak of 15.3 million requests-per-second (rps). The flood last week hit a peak of 26 million rps, with the target being the website of a company using Cloudflare's free plan, according to Omer Yoachimik, product manager at Cloudflare.

    Like the attack in April, the most recent one not only was unusual because of its size, but also because it involved using junk HTTPS requests to overwhelm a website, preventing it from servicing legit visitors and thus effectively falling off the 'net.

    Continue reading
  • Man gets two years in prison for selling 200,000 DDoS hits
    Over 2,000 customers with malice on their minds

    A 33-year-old Illinois man has been sentenced to two years in prison for running websites that paying customers used to launch more than 200,000 distributed denial-of-services (DDoS) attacks.

    A US California Central District jury found the Prairie State's Matthew Gatrel guilty of one count each of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, unauthorized impairment of a protected computer and conspiracy to commit unauthorized impairment of a protected computer. He was initially charged in 2018 after the Feds shut down 15 websites offering DDoS for hire.

    Gatrel, was convicted of owning and operating two websites – DownThem.org and AmpNode.com – that sold DDoS attacks. The FBI said that DownThem sold subscriptions that allowed the more than 2,000 customers to run the attacks while AmpNode provided customers with the server hosting. AmpNode spoofed servers that could be pre-configured with DDoS attack scripts and attack amplifiers to launch simultaneous attacks on victims.

    Continue reading
  • Sony responds to inflation with $3,700 gold-plated 'Walkman'
    In truth, a non-tape media player for Gen Xers with more money than sense

    What's old is new again with reboots of classic devices for gaming and music coming out all the time. But that kitsch value comes at a cost, even if the tech is from the current era.

    Audiophiles want digital music players that leave out cellular components in favor of sound-quality-maximizing gadgets – or at least that's what Sony appears to be betting on with the introduction of a $3,700 so-called Walkman this week.

    Before you ask, no it can't play actual tapes, which means it's not really a Walkman at all but rather an Android 11 media player that can stream and play downloaded music via apps, much like your smartphone can probably do. But we won't talk about that because gold plating.

    Continue reading
  • Verizon: Ransomware sees biggest jump in five years
    We're only here for DBIRs

    The cybersecurity landscape continues to expand and evolve rapidly, fueled in large part by the cat-and-mouse game between miscreants trying to get into corporate IT environments and those hired by enterprises and security vendors to keep them out.

    Despite all that, Verizon's annual security breach report is again showing that there are constants in the field, including that ransomware continues to be a fast-growing threat and that the "human element" still plays a central role in most security breaches, whether it's through social engineering, bad decisions, or similar.

    According to the US carrier's 2022 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) released this week [PDF], ransomware accounted for 25 percent of the observed security incidents that occurred between November 1, 2020, and October 31, 2021, and was present in 70 percent of all malware infections. Ransomware outbreaks increased 13 percent year-over-year, a larger increase than the previous five years combined.

    Continue reading
  • Cloudflare stomps huge DDoS attack on crypto platform
    At 15.3 million requests per second, the assault was the largest HTTPS blitz on record lasting 15 seconds

    Cloudflare this month halted a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack on a cryptocurrency platform that not only was unusual in its sheer size but also because it was launched over HTTPS and primarily originated from cloud datacenters rather than residential internet service providers (ISPs).

    At 15.3 million requests-per-second (rps), the DDoS bombardment was one of the largest that the internet infrastructure company has seen, and the largest HTTPS attack on record.

    It lasted less than 15 seconds and targeted a crypto launchpad, which Cloudflare analysts in a blog post said are "used to surface Decentralized Finance projects to potential investors."

    Continue reading
  • Shopping for malware: $260 gets you a password stealer. $90 for a crypto-miner...
    We take a look at low, low subscription prices – not that we want to give anyone any ideas

    A Tor-hidden website dubbed the Eternity Project is offering a toolkit of malware, including ransomware, worms, and – coming soon – distributed denial-of-service programs, at low prices.

    According to researchers at cyber-intelligence outfit Cyble, the Eternity site's operators also have a channel on Telegram, where they provide videos detailing features and functions of the Windows malware. Once bought, it's up to the buyer how victims' computers are infected; we'll leave that to your imagination.

    The Telegram channel has about 500 subscribers, Team Cyble documented this week. Once someone decides to purchase of one or more of Eternity's malware components, they have the option to customize the final binary executable for whatever crimes they want to commit.

    Continue reading
  • DDoS attacks at an all-time-high in Q1 2022, says Kaspersky
    More attacks and more targeted attacks than ever before. What could have happened to cause that uptick?

    Kaspersky has released a report showing Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks hit an all-time-high in the first quarter of 2022.

    The attacks detected by the security outfit easily surpassed those of the previous quarter and were up 46 percent on the same time last year. The number of targeted attacks was up by an even higher percentage – 81 percent compared to the previous quarter.

    DDoS attacks, as Reg readers know, are designed to disrupt network resources of businesses and public services. They are particularly nasty when compromised systems are depended upon by the wider population.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022