Son of Kaspersky Lab's CEO 'kidnapped'

Held for €3m ransom, says unconfirmed report


The 20-year-old son of Kaspersky Lab's CEO has reportedly gone missing, with kidnappers said to be demanding €3m for his release.

According to Lifenews.ru (via Google Translate), Ivan Kaspersky – the son of Eugene Kaspersky with his ex-wife Natalya Kaspersky – disappeared two days ago. Since then the police, Russian secret service and the Criminal Investigation Department have all been searching for him.

It has been reported that his father, who had been attending the InfoSec event in London, flew to Moscow where Ivan is understood to have been abducted while on his way to work.

However, Kaspersky Lab hasn't confirmed the news report, which was picked up by the BBC today.

Eugene Kaspersky, who founded the anti-virus software company, is considered to be one of the wealthiest men in Russia and was recently ranked just outside the Forbes' 100 rich-list in that country.

His personal fortune is said to be around €800m. Kaspersky's ex-wife Natalya is chairwoman of the firm. ®

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