PSN gaming network outage sparks DDoS rumours

PS3 modder counterstrike to blame?


Outage of the PlayStation network today sparked unconfirmed rumours that the downtime may be down to a denial of service attack.

Perhaps the PSN network is just having a bit of a nap, but global problems in logging into the online gaming network have given rise to speculation that it is due either to a DDoS or hacking from a group trying to get Sony to abandon its court fight against PS3 modders.

Security expert and dedicated gamer Chris Boyd of GFI Software confirmed the outage but warned it would be rash to ascribe causes just yet.

"It's definitely offline (all PSN website portals have it flagged as red at the moment) although there's no way to confirm at the moment what the cause could be," Boyd Told El Reg. "It does go offline from time to time for tweaking, but as you rightly point out there's a been a lot of DDoS taking place recently."

Freewheeling hacking collective Anonymous launched an operation against Sony – OpSony – earlier this month in protest against the entertainment giant's lawsuits against PS3 modders. OpSony led to outages in a number of Sony-related websites just over two weeks ago. Whether this operation has since been extended to the PlayStation Network itself remains unclear. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Ancient with a dash of modern: We joined the Royal Navy to find there's little new in naval navigation

    Following the Fleet Navigating Officers' course

    Boatnotes II The art of not driving your warship into the coast or the seabed is a curious blend of the ancient and the very modern, as The Reg discovered while observing the Royal Navy's Fleet Navigating Officers' (FNO) course.

    Held aboard HMS Severn, "sea week" of the FNO course involves taking students fresh from classroom training and putting them on the bridge of a real live ship – and then watching them navigate through progressively harder real-life challenges.

    "It's about finding where the students' capacity limit is," FNO instructor Lieutenant Commander Mark Raeburn told The Register. Safety comes first: the Navy isn't interested in having navigators who can't keep up with the pressures and volume of information during pilotage close to shore – or near enemy minefields.

    Continue reading
  • Darmstadt, we have a problem – ESA reveals its INTEGRAL space telescope was three hours from likely death

    Gamma ray-spotting 'scope was spinning uncontrollably and unable to make 'leccy until dramatic rescue

    The European Space Agency (ESA) revealed on Monday that its 19-year-old International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) had a near-death experience last month when failure of a small yet significant part caused it to spin uncontrollably and prevented its solar panels from generating power.

    According to ESA's blog, one of the scope's three active 'reaction wheels' – flywheels that help to stabilise attitude – turned off without warning. Absent the reaction wheel's energy, INTEGRAL rotated dangerously.

    The ESA activated Emergency Safe Attitude Mode, but that was ineffective because a July 2020 failure had left the geriatric satellite's thrusters inoperable.

    Continue reading
  • When it comes to ransomware, every second hurts

    Fortinet seeks to make EDR easy for non-specialists

    Sponsored For the longest time it seemed that modern endpoint detection and response (EDR) was getting on top of the worst malware, only for that certainty to evaporate in a single day in June 2017 thanks to a strange malware event remembered as the NotPetya attack.

    A lot of virtual ink has flowed on the origins of NotPetya but the most important aspect of its behaviour for anyone involved in endpoint defence EDR was the stunning speed with which it turned entire networks of computers into boxes uselessly pushing warm air. The word ‘fast’ gets bandied around a lot in malware incidents but for once this was no hyperbole, reportedly downing an entire Ukrainian bank in 45 seconds and a network running part of the country’s transit system in a third of that time.

    That means the infection unfolded in roughly 15 seconds to less than a minute. As with the equally swift WannaCry infection which had encrypted at least 200,000 computers in 150 countries only weeks earlier, this was far faster than EDR systems of the time - and the teams fielding the alerts generated by them - could possibly react. Security Operations Centre (SoC) teams couldn’t even ask employees to turn their computers off.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021