MP headshot sex rating site: Gentlemen prefer Tories

Pearl necklace set dominates Members' rankings


British politicians and politics fanciers, if no one else, are wildly excited today by the appearance of a website which asks viewers to decide which of two randomly-selected MPs they would prefer to have sex with, and then uses this information to rate the Members of each gender in order of attractiveness.

At the time of writing, the ladies' list on sexymp.co.uk appears to indicate that the gentlemen (and others preferring female boudoir companionship) of the internet have a decided partiality for Conservative women.

The top ten contains eight Tories and the bottom ten only one - ratios well in excess of the party's Westminster presence. Some consolation for those whose dreams feature a more progressive beauty may be provided by the fact that sultry Labour MP Luciana Berger has occasionally held the number one spot as this piece is written.

The story's not dissimilar on the chaps' list, with seven Tory hunks gracing the top ten: however, Labour have a heavy hitter in there with David Miliband lying at number nine as this is written (well ahead of his brother, party leader Ed, at 52, and prime minister David Cameron at 103).

The website is the brainchild of Francis Boulle of Made in Chelsea TV fame. It is ad-supported, and occasionally served annoying popups during testing by the Reg.

As this is published, the site is also occasionally slow to load and/or absent, signs of possible heavy traffic from sweating parliament-bench-lickers. ®

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