Rumours confirmed: NetApp now supports tape storage

OEMing CommVault's Simpana


NetApp is supporting tape storage through an OEM deal with CommVault for Simpana 9 and SnapProtect.

A possible NetApp and CommVault deal was rumoured back in December last year, and now it has come to pass. NetApp is providing a unified console, CommVault's SnapProtect, to provide what it calls a seamless integration of snapshot copies, SnapVault replication and backup to archival storage on tape through Simpana 9.

CommVault says Simpana v9 "is application, operating system, and disk aware. It quickly creates copies that are highly available, by integrating and leveraging hardware array-based snapshot technologies. Then, data is efficiently moved to appropriate tiers of storage — whether it be disk, tape, or cloud."

NetApp's release highlights tape. For example, it says "SnapProtect software combines high-speed NetApp Snapshots and disk-to-disk replication with traditional tape backup processes in a single solution."

NetApp also said it has a "commitment to OEM business models as an integral component of the company's strategy to expand its market reach".

Simpana 9 supports both source and target deduplication and is claimed to be able to backup hundreds of virtual machines in minutes. Existing Simpana users will be able to manage NetApp snapshots and replication in their Simpana environment.

CommVault recently struck a deal with Dell and has an OEM deal with HDS. This NetApp OEM agreement should increase its revenues significantly. NetApp's channel partners, and CommVault's, should be able to sell tape archival systems and tape backup systems alongside and integrated with NetApp storage. ®


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