Alleged LulzSec hacker still inside

Questioning continues

Got Tips? 63 Reg comments

The Metropolitan Police are still holding a 19-year-old man on suspicion of involvement with the LulzSec group of hackers.

LulzSec itself, via Twitter, refuted claims that he is some sort of leader. The group also posted the identities of two US residents they accuse of talking to police. The group warned: "There is no mercy on the Lulz Boat."

Meanwhile UK papers have named the alleged hacker as Ryan Cleary, of Wickford, Essex. Police sources told the Currant Bun they believe he is "a major player" within LulzSec.

LulzSec said he ran an IRC server used to host chatrooms.

The group said: "Clearly the UK police are so desperate to catch us that they've gone and arrested someone who is, at best, mildly associated with us. Lame."

"We use Ryan's server, we also use Efnet, 2600, Rizon and AnonOps IRC servers. That doesn't mean they're all part of our group."

The hackers also suggested people continue to release fake LulzSec news because it helps separate the fact-checking media from "the peon masses".

The Met confirmed to us they are still holding a 19-year-old for questioning. He has not been charged yet.

Cleary's mum told Sun Ryan was agoraphobic and has a history of mental illness. Ryan's half-brother told the paper: "Ryan used to be part of WikiLeaks. He has upset someone doing that and they made a Facebook page having a go at him."

He was arrested by members of Scotland Yard's e-crime unit acting on intelligence from the FBI. Because LulzSec attacked websites belonging to the US Senate, CIA and FBI there are fears that Cleary could face extradition to face charges in the US.

In other news, a Twitter account reported to CEOP for hosting child sex abuse images has been removed from the service following yesterday's complaints. ®

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