Sony bomby-batteries pre-fingered

Market stitch-up mucho?


The US Department of Justice is considering a full-blown investigation into Sony's rechargeable batteries.

Sony told Bloomberg that it had received a request for information on 3 May but declined further comment. Such a request is normally part of early DoJ probing - short of formal and public investigation.

Presumably the DoJ has concerns that Sony might have been abusing its strong position, although to be fair Sony has watched its share of the market fall in recent years. This is at least in part because the market has changed more quickly than Sony.

The Japanese giant has made noises about shifting into vehicle batteries but hsa been slow to move into the market.

Sony also suffered blowback from the recall of exploding batteries - both in its own machines and those sold by Apple, HP and Dell.

The electronics giant is also being probed for its role in the optical drive market. ®


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