17 flock to see Gordon Ramsay turkey

Love's Kitchen takes £121 in opening week


Sweary chef Gordon Ramsay looks a likely Razzie candidate after his film debut attracted just 17 cinemagoers in its opening week.

Romcom Love's Kitchen opened in the UK last Friday, and the Sun reckons it took a lean 121 quid in five cinemas, or "£1 more than the cost of a meal at one of his posh restaurants".

The movie copped a severe shoeing even before it was served up on the big screen. The makers ill-advisedly posted a trailer on YouTube, and despite director James Hacking's claim that Gordo's performance "had the cast in stitches", one commenter gasped: "Oh my word what an absolute stinker."

That extended trailer has now been removed, but if you want to see what all the fuss is about, you're advised to pop a couple of valium washed down with a stiff brandy and click here.

US viewers wishing to partake of the "banquet of awfulness" can fill their boots when the film goes straight to DVD across the Pond. ®

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