Baidu rejigs business units, operations boss quits

Biggest Chinese search engine rotates execs


China's number one search engine is restructuring its business operations and has let go of its senior veep Shen Haoyu for "personal reasons".

It plans to shake up its sales, commercial operations, user products and technologies, and commercial products and technologies divisions.

The company said in a statement that it would "implement an executive rotational" programme in a move to get more out of its management team.

"With the development and rising complexity of Baidu's business, promoting organisational innovation and personnel training have become important tasks," said the firm's boss Robin Li.

"Over the past decade, we have constantly upgraded and improved our operations to deliver excellent results. With the realignment of Baidu's four main business functions, I'm confident that we will spur exciting new developments in technologies and products, create greater efficiencies in our sales operations, and enhance synergies in our management structure."

Baidu said that Shen would leave at the end of July and cited "personal reasons" for his departure from the company. ®

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