Misco reaps harvest of rage in Twitter Touchpad debacle

'You've pissed off the ppl. They don't forget.'


Misco has earned the wrath of the Twitterati after it screwed up an HP Touchpad offer.

The unloved fondleslab clones became the hottest gadget since the iPhone 7 almost as soon as HP said it was ditching the devices.

Since the announcement, and subsequent massive price cuts, everyone and their dog wants a Touchpad. There's talk of porting a version of Android to the slabs to make them more useable.

Enter Misco, which took to Twitter to claim it was about to start slashing prices – prices in the US have fallen as low as $50 while UK punters have only seen a minor price cut of about £50.

So when Misco marketeers twittered: "If you're looking for reduced prices on the HP TouchPad, stay tuned! We'll have some news soon, watch this space!" many people expected a massive price cut.

At the first sign of interest Misco's website promptly fell over which was irritating enough. But worse was a tweet from Misco which said: "Due to unprecedented demand for the HP Touchpad – our stock has sold out".

Pissed off punters wasted no time venting their ire on Twitter: "Disappointed. Called earlier, was told to call back for lower price, now phone not answered and all sold out. Waste of a day!"

Others asked why the reseller's eBay store was still showing slabs in stock.

One twit said: "Maybe you've made some money from sales (somehow?), but I'm guessing you've pissed off more £££-worth of ppl. They don't forget."

As of going to press we hadn't heard back from Misco.

Thanks to Reg reader Rikki for tipping us off.

The saga should be available here. ®

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