Innovatio targets Wi-Fi users with patent suits

Promises not to sue individuals. For now


Having found Cisco and Motorola (prior to its Google borgification) in the mood for a vigorous fightback, Innovatio IP Ventures is changing tack and filing lawsuits against Wi-Fi users for patent infringement.

The company kindly promises not to target individuals; rather, its filings look for payoffs from corporate Wi-Fi customers, most recently hotels.

Patent Examiner details new suits filed in mid-September against major hotel chains like Marriott, Hyatt, Best Western and others, all of which accuse the users of violating its Wi-Fi patents and seeking royalties for each of more than 200 locations using Wi-Fi.

This follows an earlier suit brought against Caribou Coffee, restaurant chain Cosí, Panera Bread and others. That suit, which seems to have passed relatively unnoticed at the time, brought a response from Cisco and Motorola seeking to have the patents in question set aside.

Innovatio IP Ventures was only incorporated in February of this year, and within weeks had acquired the suite of patents from Broadcom which it is now seeking to enforce.

The organization told Patent Examiner it doesn’t intend suing individual end users; businesses, on the other hand, are fair game because even a Mariott probably won’t think the reported price tag of between $US2,300 and $US5,000 per site as worth calling lawyers about.

The patents in question mostly cover protocols: like this one, covering a network with a “roaming terminal communication protocol”, or this one, covering mesh networking, or networks with sleeping terminals.

Since all of the patents have passed through Broadcom’s hands, Patent Examiner studiously avoids speculating that the vendor is behind either the lawsuits or the company. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Uncle Sam to clip wings of Pegasus-like spyware – sorry, 'intrusion software' – with proposed export controls

    Surveillance tech faces trade limits as America syncs policy with treaty obligations

    More than six years after proposing export restrictions on "intrusion software," the US Commerce Department's Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has formulated a rule that it believes balances the latitude required to investigate cyber threats with the need to limit dangerous code.

    The BIS on Wednesday announced an interim final rule that defines when an export license will be required to distribute what is basically commercial spyware, in order to align US policy with the 1996 Wassenaar Arrangement, an international arms control regime.

    The rule [PDF] – which spans 65 pages – aims to prevent the distribution of surveillance tools, like NSO Group's Pegasus, to countries subject to arms controls, like China and Russia, while allowing legitimate security research and transactions to continue. Made available for public comment over the next 45 days, the rule is scheduled to be finalized in 90 days.

    Continue reading
  • Global IT spending to hit $4.5 trillion in 2022, says Gartner

    The future's bright, and expensive

    Corporate technology soothsayer Gartner is forecasting worldwide IT spending will hit $4.5tr in 2022, up 5.5 per cent from 2021.

    The strongest growth is set to come from enterprise software, which the analyst firm expects to increase by 11.5 per cent in 2022 to reach a global spending level of £670bn. Growth has fallen slightly, though. In 2021 it was 13.6 per cent for this market segment. The increase was driven by infrastructure software spending, which outpaced application software spending.

    The largest chunk of IT spending is set to remain communication services, which will reach £1.48tr next year, after modest growth of 2.1 per cent. The next largest category is IT services, which is set to grow by 8.9 per cent to reach $1.29tr over the next year, according to the analysts.

    Continue reading
  • Memory maker Micron moots $150bn mega manufacturing moneybag

    AI and 5G to fuel demand for new plants and R&D

    Chip giant Micron has announced a $150bn global investment plan designed to support manufacturing and research over the next decade.

    The memory maker said it would include expansion of its fabrication facilities to help meet demand.

    As well as chip shortages due to COVID-19 disruption, the $21bn-revenue company said it wanted to take advantage of the fact memory and storage accounts for around 30 per cent of the global semiconductor industry today.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021